Academic Medical Centers

Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

Intercessory prayers for health or healing are requests to an object of worship for the preservation or restoration of health. There has been a recent proliferation of clinical trials that compare the health outcome of a group of prayed-for patients with that of controls, to test the efficacy of intercessory prayer. In this essay, the author defines the concept of intercessory prayer, contrasts it with other forms of prayer, and reviews the literature concerning clinical trials of its efficacy.

Author(s): 
Halperin, E. C.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry: Official Journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to examine the religious characteristics of older medical inpatients with major and minor depression, compare them with religious characteristics of nondepressed patients, and examine their relationship to severity and type of depression. METHODS: Medical inpatients over age 50 at Duke University Medical Center (DUMC) and three community hospitals were identified with depressive disorder using a structured psychiatric interview. Detailed information was obtained on their psychiatric, medical, and religious characteristics.

Author(s): 
Koenig, Harold G.
Publication Title: 
Clinical nurse specialist CNS

BACKGROUND: There has been an increase in the use and awareness of complementary and integrative therapies in the United States over the last 10 years. Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) are in an ideal place to influence this paradigm shift in medicine to provide holistic care. PURPOSE: This study was designed to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by CNSs in a large Midwest medical center. DESIGN: This study used a descriptive exploratory correlational design.

Author(s): 
Cutshall, Susanne
Derscheid, Della
Miers, Anne G.
Ruegg, Suzanne
Schroeder, Barbara J.
Tucker, Sharon
Wentworth, Laura
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) clinical services are increasingly provided within conventional health care settings. OBJECTIVE: To determine how a subset of U.S. academic health centers is credentialing CAM providers. DESIGN: An electronic survey was created focusing on the credentialing method utilized for six specific types of CAM clinical practitioners within academic medical settings. METHODS: This survey was electronically distributed to 33 academic health centers in the United States during the summer 2004.

Author(s): 
Nedrow, Anne
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

INTRODUCTION: The National Institutes of Health provided grants to the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) and 14 other allopathic academic health centers for the development of curricula in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). A key component of the curriculum evaluation for OHSU was provided by a survey assessing attitudes toward CAM and selected personality characteristics of entering students in chiropractic, naturopathic, Oriental, and allopathic medicine in the Pacific Northwest and Upper Midwest.

Author(s): 
Nedrow, Anne R.
Istvan, Joe
Haas, Mitchell
Barrett, Richard
Salveson, Catherine
Moore, Gerald
Hammerschlag, Richard
Keenan, Edward
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To describe the establishment of a multidisciplinary team of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers and educators in an urban pediatric hospital and affiliated medical school. BACKGROUND: Pediatric CAM use is increasing. Physicians are interested in CAM-related education but few programs had been developed in pediatrics. In 1998, Children's Hospital Boston established the Center for Holistic Pediatric Education and Research (CHPER), a CAM multidisciplinary team providing clinical services, education, and research.

Author(s): 
Highfield, Ellen Silver
McLellan, Mary C.
Kemper, Kathi J.
Risko, Wanessa
Woolf, Alan D.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) clinical services are increasingly provided within conventional health care settings. OBJECTIVE: To determine how a subset of U.S. academic health centers is credentialing CAM providers. DESIGN: An electronic survey was created focusing on the credentialing method utilized for six specific types of CAM clinical practitioners within academic medical settings. METHODS: This survey was electronically distributed to 33 academic health centers in the United States during the summer 2004.

Author(s): 
Nedrow, Anne
Publication Title: 
BMC medical education

BACKGROUND: There is significant and growing national interest for introducing Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) instruction into allopathic medical education. We measured CAM attitudes, use, and information-seeking behaviors as a baseline to evaluate future planned CAM instruction.

Author(s): 
Lie, Désirée A.
Boker, John
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Use of complementary medicine is common, consumer driven and usually outpatient focused. We wished to determine interest among the medical staff at a North Carolina academic medical center in integrating diverse therapies and services into comprehensive care. METHODS: We conducted a cross sectional on-line survey of physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants at a tertiary care medical center in 2006.

Author(s): 
Kemper, Kathi J.
Dirkse, Deborah
Eadie, Dee
Pennington, Melissa
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

INTRODUCTION: The National Institutes of Health provided grants to the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) and 14 other allopathic academic health centers for the development of curricula in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). A key component of the curriculum evaluation for OHSU was provided by a survey assessing attitudes toward CAM and selected personality characteristics of entering students in chiropractic, naturopathic, Oriental, and allopathic medicine in the Pacific Northwest and Upper Midwest.

Author(s): 
Nedrow, Anne R.
Istvan, Joe
Haas, Mitchell
Barrett, Richard
Salveson, Catherine
Moore, Gerald
Hammerschlag, Richard
Keenan, Edward

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