Academic Medical Centers

Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To characterize patients seeking care at a university-based integrative medicine practice, and to assess short-term changes in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) associated with integrative medical treatment. DESIGN: Prospective, observational study. SETTING: This study was conducted at a large U.S. academic medical center affiliated with the Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine. PARTICIPANTS: Seven hundred and sixty-three (763) new patients with diverse medical conditions participated in the study.

Author(s): 
Greeson, Jeffrey M.
Rosenzweig, Steven
Halbert, Steven C.
Cantor, Ira S.
Keener, Matthew T.
Brainard, George C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: There is a growing need for students and practitioners of Traditional Chinese Medicine to gain experience with standardized data collection, patient outcomes measurement, and practice-based research. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a process for standardized data collection that could eventually be adopted for clinical, research, and quality assurance purposes. SETTINGS/LOCATION: The setting for this study was an acupuncture and Oriental medicine teaching clinic in Bloomington, Minnesota.

Author(s): 
Maiers, Michele
McKenzie, Eileen
Evans, Roni
McKenzie, Mark
Publication Title: 
Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders

BACKGROUND: The use of chromium-containing dietary supplements is widespread among patients with type 2 diabetes. Chromium's effects in patients at high risk for developing diabetes, especially those with metabolic syndrome, is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of chromium picolinate (CrPic) on glucose metabolism in patients with metabolic syndrome. METHOD: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was conducted at a U.S. academic medical center.

Author(s): 
Iqbal, Nayyar
Cardillo, Serena
Volger, Sheri
Bloedon, Leanne T.
Anderson, Richard A.
Boston, Raymond
Szapary, Philippe O.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

This research documents policies in 39 randomly selected academic medical centers integrating complementary and alternative medical (CAM) services into conventional care. Twenty-three offered CAM services-most commonly, acupuncture, massage, dietary supplements, mind-body therapies, and music therapy. None had written policies concerning credentialing practices or malpractice liability. Only 10 reported a written policy governing use of dietary supplements, although three sold supplements in inpatient formularies, one in the psychiatry department, and five in outpatient pharmacies.

Author(s): 
Cohen, Michael H.
Sandler, Lynne
Hrbek, Andrea
Davis, Roger B.
Eisenberg, David M.
Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

OBJECTIVE: To survey the use of complementary and alternative medical therapies by pediatric pain management services affiliated with major universities. DESIGN: A telephone survey was conducted of pediatric anesthesia training programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the United States. The survey instrument included questions on the provision of complementary and alternative medical therapies in their pediatric pain programs. RESULTS: Forty-three pediatric anesthesia fellowship programs (100%) responded to the survey.

Author(s): 
Lin, Yuan-Chi
Lee, Anne C. C.
Kemper, Kathi J.
Berde, Charles B.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

CONTEXT: Massage is the most common complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy used in hospitals in the United States. As such, it is often the first CAM therapy to be integrated with conventional medicine. However, few academic medical centers have a written standard policy to guide this integration. This lack of standard policy may impede institutions from offering massage therapy as a clinical service, and may put health care professionals and institutions at risk through a failure to clearly address criteria for practice credentials or malpractice liability.

Author(s): 
Myklebust, Monica
Iler, Joanne
Publication Title: 
Clinical nurse specialist CNS

BACKGROUND: There has been an increase in the use and awareness of complementary and integrative therapies in the United States over the last 10 years. Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) are in an ideal place to influence this paradigm shift in medicine to provide holistic care. PURPOSE: This study was designed to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by CNSs in a large Midwest medical center. DESIGN: This study used a descriptive exploratory correlational design.

Author(s): 
Cutshall, Susanne
Derscheid, Della
Miers, Anne G.
Ruegg, Suzanne
Schroeder, Barbara J.
Tucker, Sharon
Wentworth, Laura
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) clinical services are increasingly provided within conventional health care settings. OBJECTIVE: To determine how a subset of U.S. academic health centers is credentialing CAM providers. DESIGN: An electronic survey was created focusing on the credentialing method utilized for six specific types of CAM clinical practitioners within academic medical settings. METHODS: This survey was electronically distributed to 33 academic health centers in the United States during the summer 2004.

Author(s): 
Nedrow, Anne
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To characterize patients seeking care at a university-based integrative medicine practice, and to assess short-term changes in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) associated with integrative medical treatment. DESIGN: Prospective, observational study. SETTING: This study was conducted at a large U.S. academic medical center affiliated with the Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine. PARTICIPANTS: Seven hundred and sixty-three (763) new patients with diverse medical conditions participated in the study.

Author(s): 
Greeson, Jeffrey M.
Rosenzweig, Steven
Halbert, Steven C.
Cantor, Ira S.
Keener, Matthew T.
Brainard, George C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

In the current climate of accountability, health care financing reform and the demand on all health professions for evidence, there is an urgent need to expand clinical research activity within the profession. Those randomized clinical trials that have been reported in the literature have focused primarily on low back and headache pain. Only recently have studies been initiated to investigate the effectiveness of chiropractic interventions for conditions other than back pain.

Author(s): 
Sawyer, C.
Haas, M.
Nelson, C.
Elkington, W.

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