Adaptation, Psychological

Publication Title: 
AAOHN journal: official journal of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses

Mindfulness meditation (MfM) is a mind-body therapy identified by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Initially taught in a formal classroom setting, MfM is a sustainable intervention with minimal costs that can be used over time. For veterans, after mastery, this technique shows promise in improving health outcomes and quality of life. This article describes MfM, discusses the conceptual framework and evidence-based research for MfM, and identifies the implications of MfM use by health care providers who are caring for war veterans.

Author(s): 
Cuellar, Norma G.
Publication Title: 
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports

The importance of psychological skills training (PST) in the development of athletic performance is widely recognized. This paper is a comprehensive review of PST in elite sports, with a special focus on high-intensity sports (HIS). The reviewed literature showed a lack of convincing evidence and theoretical underpinning concerning traditional psychological skills to enhance performance in HIS. Therefore, a model with three conceptual levels (psychological demands, skills and techniques) is presented.

Author(s): 
Birrer, D.
Morgan, G.
Publication Title: 
Family & Community Health

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among Americans each year, yet the misperception still exists that cardiovascular disease is not a serious health problem for women. Evidence indicates that anxiety contributes to the development of heart disease. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of Kabat-Zinn's mindfulness-based stress reduction program to reduce anxiety in women with heart disease. Anxiety, emotional control, coping styles, and health locus of control were compared in a treatment and control group of women with heart disease.

Author(s): 
Tacón, Anna M.
McComb, Jacalyn
Caldera, Yvonne
Randolph, Patrick
Publication Title: 
Psycho-Oncology

OBJECTIVE: This meta-analysis was conducted to investigate the effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) on the mental and physical health status of various cancer patients. METHODS: Ten studies (randomized-controlled trials and observational studies) were found to be eligible for meta-analysis. Individual study results were categorized into mental and physical variables and Cohen's effect size d was computed for each category.

Author(s): 
Ledesma, Dianne
Kumano, Hiroaki
Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To describe the construct of mindfulness meditation and systematically review instruments measuring the psychological impact of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) on health among patients with cancer. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Knowledge, EBSCO, and published literature (1987-2006). DATA SYNTHESIS: 13 psychological instruments used in seven studies (2000-2005) to measure effects of MBSR on health in patients with cancer were reviewed. Most studies used a one-group pre- and post-test design.

Author(s): 
Matchim, Yaowarat
Armer, Jane M.
Publication Title: 
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes

OBJECTIVE: To systematically identify and appraise evidence on associations between psychological factors (moods, beliefs, personality) and Health-related QoL (HRQoL) and/or global QoL in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). METHODS: A systematic review was conducted in several online databases (PsycINFO, EMBASE, PubMed and CINAHL) up to October 2015. Articles were included if they reported associations between psychological factors (moods, beliefs and personality) and HRQoL and/or global QoL in an ALS population.

Author(s): 
van Groenestijn, Annerieke C.
Kruitwagen-van Reenen, Esther T.
Visser-Meily, Johanna M. A.
van den Berg, Leonard H.
Schröder, Carin D.
Publication Title: 
Academic Psychiatry: The Journal of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the Association for Academic Psychiatry

OBJECTIVE: Because medical students experience a considerable amount of stress during training, academic leaders have recognized the importance of developing stress-management programs for medical students. The authors set out to identify all controlled trials of stress-management interventions and determine the efficacy of those interventions. METHOD: The authors searched the published English-language articles on PsycINFO and PubMed, using a combination of the following search terms: stress-management, distress, burnout, coping, medical student, wellness.

Author(s): 
Shiralkar, Malan T.
Harris, Toi B.
Eddins-Folensbee, Florence F.
Coverdale, John H.
Publication Title: 
Palliative Medicine

BACKGROUND: There is a need to identify proactive, evidence-based interventions to support informal palliative caregivers. Mindfulness-based interventions, evidenced in the literature as providing physical and mental health benefits for diverse populations, may have application in the setting of palliative caregiving. AIM: To describe, evaluate and synthesise the peer-reviewed literature on the effects of mindfulness-based interventions for informal palliative caregivers.

Author(s): 
Jaffray, Linda
Bridgman, Heather
Stephens, Miranda
Skinner, Timothy
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

Understanding the malleable determinants of cellular aging is critical to understanding human longevity. Telomeres may provide a pathway for exploring this question. Telomeres are the protective caps at the ends of chromosomes. The length of telomeres offers insight into mitotic cell and possibly organismal longevity. Telomere length has now been linked to chronic stress exposure and depression. This raises the question of mechanism: How might cellular aging be modulated by psychological functioning?

Author(s): 
Epel, Elissa
Daubenmier, Jennifer
Moskowitz, Judith Tedlie
Folkman, Susan
Blackburn, Elizabeth
Publication Title: 
PloS One

BACKGROUND: Working in the stressful environment of the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is an emotionally charged challenge that might affect the emotional stability of medical staff. The quality of care for ICU patients and their relatives might be threatened through long-term absenteeism or a brain and skill drain if the healthcare professionals leave their jobs prematurely in order to preserve their own health.

Author(s): 
van Mol, Margo M. C.
Kompanje, Erwin J. O.
Benoit, Dominique D.
Bakker, Jan
Nijkamp, Marjan D.

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