Adolescent

Publication Title: 
International Journal of Yoga Therapy

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this research was to examine the evidence for delivering yoga-based interventions in schools. METHODS: An electronic literature search was conducted to identify peer-reviewed, published studies in which yoga and a meditative component (breathing practices or meditation) were taught to youths in a school setting. Pilot studies, single cohort, quasi-experimental, and randomized clinical trials were considered. RESEARCH: quality was evaluated and summarized. RESULTS: Twelve published studies were identified.

Author(s): 
Serwacki, Michelle L.
Cook-Cottone, Catherine
Publication Title: 
Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America

Complementary and integrative strategies are widely used by families with children who have mental health diagnoses. The therapies used by these children include herbs, dietary supplements, massage, acupuncture, meditation, and naturopathy. The literature on efficacy of complementary and alternative approaches is of limited value, and studies are needed to test efficacy and safety. Interpretation of complementary and integrative health care studies for symptomatic management of mental health conditions is hampered by study design and methodological limitations.

Author(s): 
Edwards, Emmeline
Mischoulon, David
Rapaport, Mark
Stussman, Barbara
Weber, Wendy
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: A growing number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have investigated the therapeutic value of yoga interventions. This bibliometric analysis aimed to provide a comprehensive review of the characteristics of the totality of available randomized yoga trials. METHODS: All RCTs of yoga were eligible. Medline/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, IndMED, and the tables of content of yoga specialty journals not listed in medical databases were screened through February 2014. Bibliometric data, data on participants, and intervention were extracted and analyzed descriptively.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Lauche, Romy
Dobos, Gustav
Publication Title: 
Journal of Human Hypertension

Some evidence from previous randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews has demonstrated a positive association between hypertension and transcendental meditation (TM). However, other trials and reviews showed the effect of TM on blood pressure (BP) was unclear but did not use subgroup analysis to rigorously investigate this relationship. The American Heart Association has stated that TM is potentially beneficial but did not give a standard indication. The present study explored several subgroup analyses in systematic reviews to investigate the effect of TM on BP.

Author(s): 
Bai, Z.
Chang, J.
Chen, C.
Li, P.
Yang, K.
Chi, I.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

Previous research has shown the vast mental and physical health benefits associated with yoga. Yoga practice can be divided into subcategories that include posture-holding exercise (asana), breathing (pranayama, Kriya), and meditation (Sahaj) practice. Studies measuring mental health outcomes have shown decreases in anxiety, and increases in cognitive performance after yoga interventions. Similar studies have also shown cognitive advantages amongst yoga practitioners versus non-practitioners.

Author(s): 
Desai, Radhika
Tailor, Anisha
Bhatt, Tanvi
Publication Title: 
Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of children and adolescents, with a significant impact on health services and the community in terms of economic and social burdens. The objective of this systematic review will be to evaluate the comparative efficacy and safety of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments in children and adolescents with ADHD.

Author(s): 
Catalá-López, Ferrán
Hutton, Brian
Núñez-Beltrán, Amparo
Mayhew, Alain D.
Page, Matthew J.
Ridao, Manuel
Tobías, Aurelio
Catalá, Miguel A.
Tabarés-Seisdedos, Rafael
Moher, David
Publication Title: 
Pediatrics

Mind-body therapies are popular and are ranked among the top 10 complementary and integrative medicine practices reportedly used by adults and children in the 2007-2012 National Health Interview Survey. A growing body of evidence supports the effectiveness and safety of mind-body therapies in pediatrics. This clinical report outlines popular mind-body therapies for children and youth and examines the best-available evidence for a variety of mind-body therapies and practices, including biofeedback, clinical hypnosis, guided imagery, meditation, and yoga.

Author(s): 
SECTION ON INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE
Publication Title: 
Pediatric Rheumatology Online Journal

BACKGROUND: To assess the quality of evidence for the effects of psychosocial therapies on pain and function in children with rheumatic diseases. METHODS: We conducted a literature search of MEDLINE and PsycINFO for randomized clinical trials of psychosocial interventions for pain and disability in children with rheumatic diseases from January 1969 to September 2015. Studies with a sample size less than 10 subjects were excluded. Study quality was assessed using the Jadad score. RESULTS: Five articles met inclusion criteria, for a total of 229 patients, aged 5 to 18 years.

Author(s): 
Cohen, Ezra M.
Morley-Fletcher, Alessio
Mehta, Darshan H.
Lee, Yvonne C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To summarize and evaluate evidence for the effect of yoga on menstrual disorders. METHODS: PubMed, CINAHL/MEDLINE, Web of Science, AMED, and Scopus were searched for English-language literature relevant to the review question. All primary research studies were included. RESULTS: Fifteen studies described in 18 papers were included in the review. A range of yoga interventions were used. Some studies used a combination of Asana, Pranayama, and other yogic relaxation or meditation techniques.

Author(s): 
Oates, Jennifer
Publication Title: 
Radiotherapy and Oncology: Journal of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology

PURPOSE: Determining the appropriate rate of radiotherapy (RT) utilization is important for health care planning and resource allocation. The difference between the observed and the appropriate RT rate is influenced by the choice of a criterion based benchmarking (CBB) or evidence-based estimates (EBEST) measure.

Author(s): 
Shack, Lorraine
Lu, Shuang
Weeks, Lee-Anne
Craighead, Peter
Kerba, Marc

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