Affect

Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

Positive self-presentation may have beneficial consequences for mood that are typically overlooked. Across a series of studies, participants underestimated how good they would feel in situations that required them to put their best face forward. In Studies 1 and 2A, participants underestimated the emotional benefits of interacting with an opposite sex stranger versus the benefits of interacting with a romantic partner.

Author(s): 
Dunn, Elizabeth W.
Biesanz, Jeremy C.
Human, Lauren J.
Finn, Stephanie
Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

This study extends research on the adaptive aspects of dispositional optimism to romantic relationships. We hypothesized that optimism would be positively linked to cooperative problem solving in romantic relationships, given previous research indicating that optimists are likely to use approach coping strategies. Results indicated that optimism was linked to satisfying and happy romantic relationships, and a substantial portion of this association was mediated by reports of cooperative problem solving.

Author(s): 
Assad, Kimberly K.
Donnellan, M. Brent
Conger, Rand D.
Publication Title: 
Health Communication

Contemporary theory in interpersonal communication and health psychology supports the prediction that engaging in affectionate behavior within established relationships has a direct effect on the alleviation of stress symptoms following exposure to an acute stressor. Participants in this study were exposed to a series of standard laboratory stressors and were subsequently assigned either to an experimental group or to 1 of 2 control groups. Those in the experimental group were instructed to write a letter to a loved one in which they expressed their feelings of affection for that person.

Author(s): 
Floyd, Kory
Mikkelson, Alan C.
Tafoya, Melissa A.
Farinelli, Lisa
La Valley, Angela G.
Judd, Jeff
Haynes, Mark T.
Davis, Kristin L.
Wilson, Jason
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Social Psychology

Researchers have previously reported a negative association between romantic involvement and the discrepancy between the actual self and the ideal self. The authors present a schema-based model of romantic involvement and self-discrepancy to help explain this association, focusing on the impact of terminated relationships--"ghosts from the past." In Study 1, participants primed with a past relationship reported increased self-discrepancy relative to participants primed with a present relationship.

Author(s): 
Green, Jeffrey D.
Campbell, W. Keith
Davis, Jody L.
Publication Title: 
Shinrigaku Kenkyu: The Japanese Journal of Psychology

This article develops a scale of affects in opposite-sex relationships, and investigates affects of opposite-sex love, unrequited love, and friendship. In study 1 (N= 231), a factor analysis of the affect items produced four factors: passion, affiliation-dissatisfaction, respect/trust, and aggressive/refusal. All scales were shown to be reasonably reliable (alpha > .80). In study 2 (N=295), the test-retest reliability coefficients ranged from .59 to .67. In study 3 (N=406), confirmatory factor analysis supported the four-factor structure.

Author(s): 
Tatewaki, Yosuke
Publication Title: 
Journal of Adolescence

This study examined the similarities and differences between adolescents' interactions with romantic partners and those with friends and mothers. Thirty-two adolescents were observed interacting with a romantic partner, a close friend, and their mother. Adolescents and romantic partners engaged in more conflict than adolescents and friends. Adolescents' affective responsiveness was less positive with romantic partners than with their friends. Additionally, the dyadic positivity was lower in romantic relationships than in friendships.

Author(s): 
Furman, Wyndol
Shomaker, Lauren B.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

Whereas supportive interactions are usually studied from the perspective of recipients alone, the authors used a dyadic design to incorporate the perspectives of both provider and recipient. In 2 daily diary studies, the authors modeled provider reports of support provision in intimate dyads over several weeks. The 1st involved couples experiencing daily stressors (n = 79); the 2nd involved couples experiencing a major professional stressor (n = 196).

Author(s): 
Iida, Masumi
Seidman, Gwendolyn
Shrout, Patrick E.
Fujita, Kentaro
Bolger, Niall
Publication Title: 
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

The purpose of the present study was to examine relations among multiple child and family protective factors, neighborhood disadvantage, and positive social adjustment in a sample of 226 urban, low SES boys followed from infancy to early adolescence. The results indicated that child IQ, nurturant parenting, and parent-child relationship quality, measured in early childhood, were all significantly associated with a composite measure tapping low levels of antisocial behavior and high levels of social skills at ages 11 and 12.

Author(s): 
Vanderbilt-Adriance, Ella
Shaw, Daniel S.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Social Psychology

The authors examined the degree to which ratings of negative affectivity (NA) and relational security predicted the breakup of long-distance and same-city dating relationships. Couples completed initial surveys and were contacted 1 year later about the status of their relationship. In the initial surveys, both partners completed NA and relational security assessments. Overall, both the NA and relational security of men and women predicted stability. However, as predicted, structural equation modeling revealed a gender difference in the interaction between NA and long-distance status.

Author(s): 
Cameron, Jessica J.
Ross, Michael
Publication Title: 
Body Image

This study examined couples' ratings of self and partner physical attractiveness. On the basis of the theory of positive illusions, it was expected that individuals would rate their partners as more attractive than their partners would rate themselves. Both members of 93 heterosexual couples, with a mean relationship length of about 14 years, provided ratings of both their own and their partner's physical attractiveness. Results support the theory that individuals hold positive illusions about their partner's physical attractiveness.

Author(s): 
Barelds-Dijkstra, Pieternel
Barelds, Dick P. H.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Affect