Analgesics

Publication Title: 
Compendium of Continuing Education in Dentistry (Jamesburg, N.J.: 1995)

Sedating medically compromised patients (i.e., geriatric patients, patients with cardiac, kidney, or liver diseases, and those with other severe systemic conditions) for dental procedures can increase the risk of adverse events for this group of patients and can also increase the risk of liability for the clinician. The authors treated 17 apprehensive dental patients with a combination technique using hypnosis and sedative drugs. The use of hypnosis reduced the amount of sedative agent required and alleviated patient anxiety.

Author(s): 
Lu, D. P.
Lu, G. P.
Publication Title: 
Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

The neuropharmacological profile of the total fungal extract of F. moniliforme (FM) has been investigated. FM produced dose related decrease in spontaneous motor activity (SMA) and exploratory activity, potentiated pentobarbitone hypnosis and the anticonvulsant actions of phenobarbitone and phenytoin against MES seizures, potentiated PTZ and tryptamine seizures, antagonised reserpine induced syndrome, attenuated tetrabenazine and morphine induced catalepsy and potentiated haloperidol catalepsy. FM showed per se antinociceptive activity and potentiated morphine analgesia.

Author(s): 
Ganguli, S.
Hota, D.
Goel, R. K.
Acharya, S. B.
Bhattacharya, S. K.
Publication Title: 
Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

The neuropharmacological activity profile of total fungal extract of F. oxysporum (FO) was investigated. FO enhanced spontaneous locomotor activity, exploratory behaviour and reduced pentobarbitone hypnosis. It had per se anticonvulsant action against maximal electroshock seizure (MES) and potentiated phenobarbitone and phenytoin in MES and also potentiated pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) convulsion. It antagonised morphine, tetrabenazine and haloperidol catalepsy. FO did not show per se analgesia or potentiation of morphine antinociception in mice, while both effects were present in rats.

Author(s): 
Ganguli, S.
Hota, D.
Goel, R. K.
Acharya, S. B.
Bhattacharya, S. K.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

The effects of hypnosis in connection with surgery have been described in many clinical publications, but few controlled studies have been published. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of preoperative hypnotic techniques used by patients planned for surgical removal of third mandibular molars. The patients were randomly assigned to an experimental (hypnotic techniques) or a control (no hypnotic techniques) group. During the week before the surgery, the experimental group listened to an audiotape containing a hypnotic relaxation induction.

Author(s): 
Enqvist, B.
Fischer, K.
Publication Title: 
Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America

The intent of this article is to be a comprehensive, but by no means exhaustive, review of some of the agents used for CS. The major classes and their principal uses are presented: benzodiazepines, for sedation-hypnosis, anxiolysis, and, in the case of midazolam, amnesia; and opiates, for analgesia and sedation. Also included are the miscellaneous items etomidate and propofol, for sedation-hypnosis; ketamine, for sedation and analgesia; and the phenothiazines and butyrophenones.

Author(s): 
Shields, R. E.
Publication Title: 
The Clinical Journal of Pain

OBJECTIVE: Burn injuries produce severe wound care pain that is ideally controlled on intensive burn care units with high-dosage intravenous opioid medications. We report a case illustrating the use of hypnosis for pain management when one opioid medication was ineffective. SETTING: Intensive burn care unit at a regional trauma center. PATIENT: A 55-year-old man with an extensive burn suffered from significant respiratory depression from a low dosage of opioid during wound care and also experienced uncontrolled pain. INTERVENTION: Rapid induction hypnotic analgesia.

Author(s): 
Ohrbach, R.
Patterson, D. R.
Carrougher, G.
Gibran, N.
Publication Title: 
Indian Journal of Experimental Biology

Petroleum ether (PE), benzene (BE), chloroform (CE), acetone (AE) and ethanolic (EE) extracts (50-200 or 200 mg/kg, i.p. or 200 mg/kg, p.o.) of dried Abies pindrow leaves, given 30-45 min before showed significant anti-inflammatory (both against acute and sub-acute models), analgesic, barbiturate hypnosis potentiation and anti-ulcerogenic acitivities in rats. All the extracts except EE decreased swim stress immobility in mice indicating some degree of anti-depressant activity. Only PE exhibited hypotension in dogs blocked by atropine.

Author(s): 
Singh, R. K.
Nath, G.
Goel, R. K.
Bhattacharya, S. K.
Publication Title: 
Medicinski Pregled

INTRODUCTION: In the operating room, anaesthetist must provide unconsciousness, analgesia and muscular relaxation. In intensive therapy (IT), the rules are different and not every patient requires sedation, but almost every patient needs analgesia. The patient who is alert, calm and comfortable despite the presence of tubes and cannulas in the nose, mouth, radial artery, central vein, urethra, surgical wounds, pleural space etc. does not need any sedation. However, sedation and analgesia are clinically inseparable.

Author(s): 
Pjevi?, M.
Kolak, R.
Komarcevi?, M.
Publication Title: 
Southern Medical Journal

Despite the availability of specialized treatments for chronic pain, including biofeedback training, relaxation training, and hypnotic treatment, most physicians rely on the traditional approaches of surgery or pharmacotherapy. The patient in this case study had severe and chronic pain but found little relief from pain medications that also caused side effects. She then took the initiative to learn and practice self-hypnosis with good results. Her physician in the resident's internal medicine clinic supported her endeavor and encouraged her to continue self-hypnosis.

Author(s): 
Nickelson, C.
Brende, J. O.
Gonzalez, J.
Publication Title: 
Acta Chirurgica Belgica

Between April 1994 and June 1997, 197 thyroidectomies and 21 cervical explorations for hyperparathyroidism were performed under hypnosedation (HYP) and compared to the operative data and postoperative courses of a closely-matched population (n = 121) of patients operated on under general anaesthesia (GA). Conversion from hypnosis to GA was needed in two cases (1%). All surgeons reported better operating conditions for cervicotomy using HYP.

Author(s): 
Meurisse, M.
Defechereux, T.
Hamoir, E.
Maweja, S.
Marchettini, P.
Gollogly, L.
Degauque, C.
Joris, J.
Faymonville, M. E.

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