Autogenic Training

Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis
Author(s): 
McDanal, C.
Publication Title: 
Headache

The present study was conducted to determine whether demographic variables, medical status variables, and psychological measures at pretreatment were related to pain reduction immediately following behavioral treatment for headache and at a 6-month follow-up. The study sample consisted of 156 subjects, who were selected for participation in a behavioral outcome study on the efficacy of autogenic training and cognitive self-hypnosis training. A Headache Index based on pain diaries constituted the main outcome measure.

Author(s): 
ter Kuile, M. M.
Spinhoven, P.
Linssen, A. C.
Publication Title: 
Pain

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the active cognitive ingredients of change in psychological treatments for long-term chronic headache complaints. The primary questions this study addressed were: (1) Is a cognitive self-hypnosis training which explicitly attempts to change appraisal and cognitive coping processes more effective in producing these changes than a relaxation procedure, and (2) are changes in pain appraisal and cognitive coping related to changes in pain and adjustment in the short and long term?

Author(s): 
ter Kuile, M. M.
Spinhoven, P.
Linssen, A. C.
van Houwelingen, H. C.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

The study examined the effectiveness of behaviorally-induced vasodilation (hypnosis with biofeedback and autogenics) in the treatment of upper extremity repetitive strain injuries (RSI). Thirty patients with recent onset of upper extremity RSI symptoms were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment conditions, i.e., hypnotically-induced vasodilation or a waiting-list control. Treatments were given on an individual basis, once a week for 6 weeks. Patients in the treatment condition showed highly significant increases in hand temperature between pre- and post-treatment.

Author(s): 
Moore, L. E.
Wiesner, S. L.
Publication Title: 
Perceptual and Motor Skills

Autogenic training, a method of self-hypnosis, lowers the extent of within-day variation of systolic blood pressure assessed by the circadian double amplitude. The blood pressure and heart rate of ten patients, conventionally diagnosed as having hypertension or white-coat hypertension, were automatically monitored at 30-min intervals for 7 days before autogenic training and again for 7 days, at 1 or 2 months after the start of autogenic training (practiced three times daily).

Author(s): 
Watanabe, Y.
Halberg, F.
Cornelissen, G.
Saito, Y.
Fukuda, K.
Otsuka, K.
Kikuchi, T.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

In February and March, 1973, 566 U.S. military prisoners (POWs) were released from North Vietnam. These men had been POWs for a period of time between 2 months and 9 years, with a mean incarceration of 4.44 years. They had faced physical and psychological stress similar to that experienced by POWs from previous wars: starvation, disease, inadequate shelter, lack of medical care, interrogations and torture (Deaton, Burge, Richlin & Latrownik, 1977; Mitchell, 1991). By definition, such prison conditions constituted a traumatic experience (Deaton et al., 1977).

Author(s): 
Wood, D. P.
Sexton, J. L.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery

OBJECTIVE: The role of complementary medicine techniques has generated increasing interest in today's society. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effects of one technique, self-hypnosis, and its role in coronary artery bypass surgery. We hypotesize that self-hypnosis relaxation techniques will have a positive effect on the patient's mental and physical condition following coronary artery bypass surgery. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A prospective, randomized trial was conducted.

Author(s): 
Ashton, C.
Whitworth, G. C.
Seldomridge, J. A.
Shapiro, P. A.
Weinberg, A. D.
Michler, R. E.
Smith, C. R.
Rose, E. A.
Fisher, S.
Oz, M. C.
Publication Title: 
Academic Radiology

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose was to evaluate the effects on patients' pain perception of educating interventional radiology personnel in nonpharmacologic analgesia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ninety-six patients undergoing lower-extremity arteriography or percutaneous nephrostomy were asked to rate the pain they experienced during the procedure on a scale of 0 to 5 (0 = no pain, 1 = mild pain, 2 = moderate pain, 3 = severe pain, 4 = very severe pain, 5 = worst pain possible).

Author(s): 
Lang, E. V.
Berbaum, K. S.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

The aim of this study was to determine whether hypnotic susceptibility (a) predicts pain reduction posttreatment and at follow-up independent of generic expectations of treatment outcome and mode of treatment and (b) predicts persistence of pain reduction during the follow-up period. In 169 patients with chronic tension-type headaches randomly allocated to either self-hypnosis or autogenic training, pain reduction posttreatment and at follow-up was significantly associated with hypnotic susceptibility independent of generic expectations of treatment outcome and treatment condition.

Author(s): 
Spinhoven, P.
ter Kuile, M. M.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

This study examined the influence of hypnosis, autogenic relaxation, and quiet rest on selected affective states and metabolism. The influence of body position (seated vs. supine) on these same outcome measures was also investigated. Anxiety, tension, and overall mood were assessed before and 30 minutes after each treatment, and oxygen uptake was measured continuously.

Author(s): 
Garvin, A. W.
Trine, M. R.
Morgan, W. P.

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