Cell Movement

Publication Title: 
Cardiovascular Research

OBJECTIVE: Resistin may be associated with obesity and cardiovascular diseases. However, it is unknown whether resistin directly contributes to angiogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of resistin on angiogenic potential, including endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and capillary-like tube formation. METHODS: Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were treated with resistin. Cell proliferation was evaluated by [3H]thymidine incorporation and MTS assays. Cell migration was assessed by a modified Boyden chamber assay.

Author(s): 
Mu, Hong
Ohashi, Ryuji
Yan, Shaoyu
Chai, Hong
Yang, Hui
Lin, Peter
Yao, Qizhi
Chen, Changyi
Publication Title: 
Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics

Mice lacking the vitamin D receptor (VDR) are resistant to airway inflammation. Pathogenic immune cells capable of transferring experimental airway inflammation to wildtype (WT) mice are present and primed in the VDR KO mice. Furthermore, the VDR KO immune cells homed to the WT lung in sufficient numbers to induce symptoms of asthma. Conversely, WT splenocytes, Th2 cells and hematopoetic cells induced some symptoms of experimental asthma when transferred to VDR KO mice, but the severity was less than that seen in the WT controls.

Author(s): 
Wittke, Anja
Chang, Andrew
Froicu, Monica
Harandi, Omid F.
Weaver, Veronika
August, Avery
Paulson, Robert F.
Cantorna, Margherita T.
Publication Title: 
Atherosclerosis

Chlorotyrosine is an oxidative product of hypochlorous acid and l-tyrosine, and is considered as a biomarker for oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease. However, it is not clear whether chlorotyrosine could directly contribute to vascular pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effect and potential mechanisms of chlorotyrosine on human aortic smooth muscle cell (AoSMC) migration. With Boyden chamber and wound healing assays, chlorotyrosine significantly increased AoSMC migration in a concentration- and time-dependent manner.

Author(s): 
Mu, Hong
Wang, Xinwen
Lin, Peter H.
Yao, Qizhi
Chen, Changyi
Publication Title: 
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics

Given the high fatality rate of pancreatic cancer, an effective treatment for this devastating disease is urgently needed. We have shown that mesothelin expression was higher in human pancreatic cancer cells than in human pancreatic duct epithelial cells, and mesothelin mRNA was substantially overexpressed in 18 of 21 (86%) clinical pancreatic adenocarcinoma specimens when compared with the surrounding normal tissues. However, the biological functions of mesothelin in tumor progression are not clearly understood.

Author(s): 
Li, Min
Bharadwaj, Uddalak
Zhang, Rongxin
Zhang, Sheng
Mu, Hong
Fisher, William E.
Brunicardi, F. Charles
Chen, Changyi
Yao, Qizhi
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Oncology

Glycosylation of proteins plays multiple roles in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Fucose is a monosaccharide associated with glycosylation events and is known to be over-expressed in many malignant tumors. By using alpha-L-fucosidase (alpha-L-fase), a glycosidase that specifically removes alpha-L-fucose (alpha-L-f), we have examined the potential effects of defucosylation on tumor functions, focusing on tumor progression in the context of the interaction of tumor cells with the extracellular microenvironment.

Author(s): 
Yuan, Kun
Kucik, Dennis
Singh, Raj K.
Listinsky, Catherine M.
Listinsky, Jay J.
Siegal, Gene P.
Publication Title: 
Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta

Nitrotyrosine is a new biomarker of atherosclerosis and inflammation. The objective of this study was to determine the direct effects of free nitrotyrosine on human aortic smooth muscle cell (AoSMC) migration and molecular mechanisms. By a modified Boyden chamber assay, nitrotyrosine significantly increased AoSMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner. For example, nitrotyrosine at 300 nM increased AoSMC migration up to 152% compared with l-tyrosine-treated control cells (P<0.01). Cell wound healing assay confirmed this effect.

Author(s): 
Mu, Hong
Wang, Xinwen
Lin, Peter
Yao, Qizhi
Chen, Changyi
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Investigative Dermatology

IL-12 deficiency has been shown to promote photocarcinogenesis in mice. As UVB-induced inflammation is an important tumor-promoting event in the development of skin tumors, we determined the effects of IL-12-deficiency on UVB-induced inflammatory responses in mice. For this purpose, IL-12-knockout (IL-12 KO) and their wild-type counterparts were subjected to a photocarcinogenesis protocol; skin and tumor samples were collected at the termination of the experiment, and analyzed for biomarkers of inflammation and their mediators.

Author(s): 
Meeran, Syed M.
Punathil, Thejass
Katiyar, Santosh K.
Publication Title: 
Free Radical Biology & Medicine

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress are thought to play a central role in the etiology of cell dysfunction and tissue damage in sepsis. However, there is limited and controversial evidence from in vivo studies that ROS mediate cell signaling processes that elicit acute inflammatory responses during sepsis. Because NADPH oxidase is one of the main cellular sources of ROS, we investigated the role of this enzyme in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute inflammation in vivo, utilizing mice deficient in the gp91(phox) or p47(phox) subunits of NADPH oxidase.

Author(s): 
Zhang, Wei-Jian
Wei, Hao
Frei, Balz
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Oncology

Expression and activity of CC motif ligand 2 (CCL2) is down-regulated by curcumin, the active phytochemical ingredient of turmeric (Curcuma longa), a dietary supplement often self-prescribed to promote prostate health. CCL2 is a potent chemotactic factor of prostate cancer (PCa) with important roles in development of bone metastasis. The relationship between CCL2 and curcumin, however, has not been studied in PCa. Adhesion, invasion and motility of PC-3 cells were measured in response to exposure to curcumin (30 microM; 18 h), CCL2 (100 ng/ml; 18 h) or PMA (100 ng/ml; 18 h).

Author(s): 
Herman, Jeffery G.
Stadelman, Henry L.
Roselli, Charles E.
Publication Title: 
Molecular Cancer

BACKGROUND: The progression of all cancers is characterized by increased-cell proliferation and decreased-apoptosis. The androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC) is the terminal stage of the disease. Many chemokines and cytokines are suspects to cause this increased tumor cell survival that ultimately leads to resistance to therapy and demise of the host. The AIPC cells, but not androgen-responsive cells, constitutively express abundant amount of the pro-inflammatory chemokine, Interleukin-8 (IL-8).

Author(s): 
Singh, Rajendra K.
Lokeshwar, Bal L.

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