Child Nutrition Disorders

Publication Title: 
Family & Community Health

This article situates women's roles in community health care during violence in Uganda in the 1970s. It examines the lived reality of Catholic missionary sister nurses, midwives, and physicians on the ground where sisters administered health care to local communities. The goal is to examine how religious women worked with local individuals and families in community health during periods of violence and war. Catholic sisters claimed to be apolitical, yet their mission work widened to include political issues.

Author(s): 
Reckart, Madeline
Wall, Barbra Mann
Publication Title: 
Professional Care of Mother and Child

One of the most important criteria for good health in childhood is normal growth. Taking regular accurate measurements of length and plotting them on a centile chart is essential to spot early signs of growth disorders. Be alert for a "zig-zag" pattern on the chart: it could indicate psychosocial dwarfism (see opposite). Length is more important than weight for identifying growth disorders. Lack of love, or an adverse emotional or social environment, can cause growth failure even in a child who is eating enough.

Author(s): 
Stanhope, R.
Wilks, Z.
Hamill, G.
Publication Title: 
Soins. Pédiatrie, Puériculture
Author(s): 
Devoldère, Catherine
Publication Title: 
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

Changes in food production and dietary practices are occurring faster than our understanding of their potential impact on children's health. Traditionally, pediatric gastroenterologists have studied food with respect to its nutritive value and digestibility, its influence on metabolism, its growth-promoting characteristics, and its relationship to risk and severity of disease. Biotechnology is now expanding the science of food to include disease prevention and treatment, as well as the feeding of children on a global scale.

Author(s): 
Perr, Hilary A.
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