Clergy

Publication Title: 
Journal of Community Health Nursing

To meet the challenge of preparing nurses for delivery of health care that is directed toward health promotion and focused on populations at the community level, it is critical that academicians develop new methods to educate their students. In this article, I describe an innovative clinical practice model in which an academic-community partnership was created between a college of nursing and a neighborhood grade school and parish.

Author(s): 
Lough, M. A.
Publication Title: 
ANS. Advances in nursing science

Modern historical research of women and nursing has largely neglected the role of religious groups, particularly in the American frontier. The image of women at the end of the 19th century was one of submission to male authority and confinement to the domestic sphere. However, in the pluralistic West, a variety of organized religious women built and administered hospitals, initiated professional nursing, and provided effective health care services.

Author(s): 
Marshall, E. S.
Wall, B. M.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Research

BACKGROUND: Standard histories of the nurse training school movement have focused on national leaders and organizations and have generally not included Catholic sisters, even though nuns had established approximately 220 nursing schools by 1915. OBJECTIVES: This study asks how Catholic sisters used their distinct understanding of nursing to shape their nursing schools and the nurse training movement in the United States between 1890 and 1920.

Author(s): 
Wall, B. M.
Publication Title: 
The journal of pastoral care & counseling: JPCC

The authors reviewed the literature on mental health issues among clergy and other religious professionals, using electronic searches of databases of medical (Medline), nursing (CINAHL), psychology (PsycINFO), religious (ATLA), and sociological research (Sociofile). The existing research indicates the Protestant clergy report higher levels of occupational stress than Catholic priests, brothers, or sisters. Catholic sisters repeatedly reported the lowest work-related stress, whereas women rabbis reported the highest stress levels in various studies.

Author(s): 
Weaver, Andrew J.
Flannelly, Kevin J.
Larson, David B.
Stapleton, Carolyn L.
Koenig, Harold G.
Publication Title: 
The journal of pastoral care & counseling: JPCC

After conducting telephone interviews with 130 next-of-kin whose loved one died, the authors report whether and how chaplains were helpful to these family members. Analysis of their responses indicated that chaplains were helpful in five ways.

Author(s): 
Broccolo, Gerard T.
VandeCreek, Larry
Publication Title: 
Le Infezioni in Medicina: Rivista Periodica Di Eziologia, Epidemiologia, Diagnostica, Clinica E Terapia Delle Patologie Infettive

The loss of low-lying farm-land to marshes and swamps was a striking phenomenon in Italy and other regions of Europe after the fall of the Roman Empire. Throughout the Middle Ages extensive fertile agricultural lands were abandoned due to increased marshiness and the risk of the spread of malaria diffusion. In economic and social terms, this was a further source of decline.

Author(s): 
Sabbatani, S.
Publication Title: 
Medicina Nei Secoli

Don Carlo dei Medici (1595-1666) is the son of Ferdinando I (1549-1609), Granduca of Tuscany, and becomes Cardinal of Catholic Roman Church in 1615. In 1604 Fabrizio d'Acquapendente is called in Florence to treat him, because of an aggravation of his health, and of his congenital neck's gibbosity. The recent paleopathological researches have diagnosed his congenital cervical gibbosity as effect of the Klippel-Feil's syndrome, and characteristic lesions of tubercolosis.

Author(s): 
Marinozzi, Silvia
Aruta, Alessandro
Publication Title: 
ANS. Advances in nursing science

This historical article considers nursing's work for social justice in the 1960s civil rights movement through the lens of religious sisters and brothers who advocated for racial equality. The article examines Catholic nurses' work with African Americans in the mid-20th century that took place amid the prevailing social conditions of poverty and racial disempowerment, conditions that were linked to serious health consequences.

Author(s): 
Wall, Barbra Mann
Publication Title: 
Journal of Religion and Health

This paper summarizes the perspectives of 327 Australian health care chaplains concerning their interaction with physicians within the clinical context. In general terms the findings indicated that nearly 90% of chaplains believed that it was part of their professional role to consult with physicians regarding patient/family issues. Differences of involvement between volunteer and staff chaplains, Catholic and Protestant, male and female chaplains and the type of chaplaincy training are noted, as are the perspectives of chaplaincy informants regarding their role in relation to physicians.

Author(s): 
Carey, Lindsay B.
Cohen, Jeffrey
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Communication

This study examined the mediated influence of a celebrated religious hero in South Korea, Cardinal Stephen Kim, through two forms of involvement--parasocial interaction and identification--on intention toward cornea donation and volunteerism, and it investigated how the news media diffused of his death.

Author(s): 
Bae, Hyuhn-Suhck
Brown, William J.
Kang, Seok

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