Condoms

Publication Title: 
Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy

Research on gay men's relationships has neglected monogamy. Instead, it has tended to (a) emphasize HIV risk and relationship agreements between partners regarding sex and condom use with outside partners or (b) focus on nonmonogamous relationships as emblematic of relationship innovation. On the basis of qualitative interviews with 36 gay Australian men who favored a monogamous relationship as ideal, this article explores the meaning and practice of monogamy and its association with HIV risk.

Author(s): 
Duncan, Duane
Prestage, Garrett
Grierson, Jeffrey
Publication Title: 
AIDS and behavior

Using data from a sample of single young men who have sex with men (N = 1,359, ages 18-24, 65 % White, 93 % gay), we examined whether the number of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) partners with differed across relationship typologies (e.g., friends with benefits, hookups, romantic interests). We then examined how safer sex self-efficacy, decisional balance to forego condoms, ideal relationship attributes (i.e., intimacy, passion and commitment), and limerence were associated with UAI.

Author(s): 
Bauermeister, JosÈ A.
Publication Title: 
Clearing House (Menasha, Wis.)

To challenge the distribution of condoms on school campuses with accusations of immorality and "lack of good character" appears shallow at best. Considering the home situation of many young people and their immediate environment, the act of securing a condom could be totally consistent with "good character." Certainly, abstinence up to a certain stage in a youth's life is prudent, but who is to determine the age to which, and the environment in which, abstinence must be observed universally?

Author(s): 
Rowe, R. N.
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology

OBJECTIVES: To find out if young women have specific problems with the use of contraception or contraceptive services. STUDY DESIGN: A national postal survey was conducted, RR 74%. Women aged 18-34 years (with experience of contraceptive use) were included in this report (n=1239). RESULTS: Weekly need for contraception was highest in the age group 18-24 years (61%), oral contraception being the most widely used method regardless of parity. Condoms were used by 35-37% in all age groups, either alone or combined with oral contraceptives (17% of young nulliparas).

Author(s): 
Kosunen, E.
Sihvo, S.
Koponen, P.
Hemminki, E.
Publication Title: 
Clearing House (Menasha, Wis.)

To challenge the distribution of condoms on school campuses with accusations of immorality and "lack of good character" appears shallow at best. Considering the home situation of many young people and their immediate environment, the act of securing a condom could be totally consistent with "good character." Certainly, abstinence up to a certain stage in a youth's life is prudent, but who is to determine the age to which, and the environment in which, abstinence must be observed universally?

Author(s): 
Rowe, R. N.
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology

OBJECTIVES: To find out if young women have specific problems with the use of contraception or contraceptive services. STUDY DESIGN: A national postal survey was conducted, RR 74%. Women aged 18-34 years (with experience of contraceptive use) were included in this report (n=1239). RESULTS: Weekly need for contraception was highest in the age group 18-24 years (61%), oral contraception being the most widely used method regardless of parity. Condoms were used by 35-37% in all age groups, either alone or combined with oral contraceptives (17% of young nulliparas).

Author(s): 
Kosunen, E.
Sihvo, S.
Koponen, P.
Hemminki, E.
Publication Title: 
AIDS education and prevention: official publication of the International Society for AIDS Education

Haitian women are twice as likely as men to have HIV/AIDs. Factors underlying the feminization of HIV are complex. Self-esteem is an important correlate of sexual behavior. However, its meaning and impact on health behaviors may be influenced by cultural factors. This qualitative study took place in Haiti 4 months after the 2010 earthquake and examines the meaning of self-esteem among young Haitian women seeking treatment for a recurrent sexually transmitted infection (STI).

Author(s): 
Severe, Linda
Fitzgerald, Daniel W.
Deschamps, Marie M.
Reif, Lindsey
Post, Kendall
Johnson, Warren D.
Pape, Jean W.
Boutin-Foster, Carla
Publication Title: 
AIDS (London, England)

OBJECTIVES: To study how condom use in injecting drug users' (IDU) relationships differs according to whether they are HIV-infected, and to whether their sex partner is an IDU. DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 317 street-recruited IDU were HIV-antibody tested and interviewed about 421 relationships with particular sex partners. RESULTS: Condoms were consistently (100%) used in sex between partners (during the previous 30 days) in 33% of these relationships, and their use was significantly more frequent in relationships of seropositive IDU and in relationships with non-IDU partners.

Author(s): 
Friedman, S. R.
Jose, B.
Neaigus, A.
Goldstein, M.
Curtis, R.
Ildefonso, G.
Mota, P.
Des Jarlais, D. C.
Publication Title: 
Controlled Clinical Trials

While randomised controlled trials remain the accepted 'gold standard' in medical research, participant recruitment is often problematic, particularly with primary care trials or those requiring healthy volunteers. Such difficulties can jeopardise the trial, leading to early abandonment, reduced statistical power or timetable and budget overruns. Substantial changes in recruitment plans may reduce the generalisability of the research.

Author(s): 
Gabbay, Mark
Thomas, Joanna
Publication Title: 
AIDS (London, England)

OBJECTIVES: We wished to identify which potential mediators of the Seropositive Urban Men's Intervention Trial (SUMIT) intervention were in fact changed by the intervention, and further to identify which among these factors distinguished men who decreased their risk behavior relative to those who increased it, irrespective of the intervention arm. METHODS: We examined social cognitive theory and other psychosocial variables that the intervention was designed to affect (potential mediators) in both sets of analyses.

Author(s): 
O'Leary, Ann
Hoff, Colleen C.
Purcell, David W.
GÛmez, Cynthia A.
Parsons, Jeffrey T.
Hardnett, Felicia
Lyles, Cynthia M.

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