Dermatitis, Atopic

Publication Title: 
American Journal of Clinical Dermatology

BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative interventions are becoming increasingly utilized as adjuncts to conventional treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD). While the number of studies continues to grow, the vastness of the subject coupled with the relatively poor quality and small size of the studies limit their usefulness to clinicians. PURPOSE: Our aim was to comprehensively review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of complementary and alternative therapies for AD.

Author(s): 
Vieira, Brittany L.
Lim, Neil R.
Lohman, Mary E.
Lio, Peter A.
Publication Title: 
Veterinary Dermatology

The efficacy of pharmacological interventions used to treat canine atopic dermatitis, excluding fatty acid supplementation and allergen-specific immunotherapy, was evaluated based on the systematic review of prospective clinical trials published between 1980 and 2002.

Author(s): 
Olivry, T.
Mueller, R. S.
International Task Force on Canine Atopic Dermatitis
Publication Title: 
Clinical and Experimental Dermatology

This review provides a summary of key findings from 24 systematic reviews of atopic eczema (AE) published or indexed between 1 August 2010 and 31 December 2011, updating published summaries from previous years. Epidemiological evidence points to the protective effects of early daycare, endotoxin exposure, consumption of unpasteurized milk, and early exposure to dogs, but antibiotic use in early life may increase the risk for AE.

Author(s): 
Torley, D.
Futamura, M.
Williams, H. C.
Thomas, K. S.
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

BACKGROUND: The 'hygiene hypothesis' has been used to justify a belief common among homeopaths, that the suppression of childhood infections and immunisation may lead to the development of chronic atopic diseases. OBJECTIVES: To analyse the influence of childhood infections and immunisation on the development of atopy. METHODS: Qualitative systematic review of direct epidemiological evidence (Medline 1993-2004) concerning the influence of childhood infections and immunisation on the development of atopy and discussion based on homeopathy.

Author(s): 
Adler, U. C.
Publication Title: 
Health Technology Assessment (Winchester, England)

BACKGROUND: Atopic eczema is the commonest inflammatory skin disease of childhood, affecting 15-20% of children in the UK at any one time. Adults make up about one-third of all community cases. Moderate-to-severe atopic eczema can have a profound effect on the quality of life for both sufferers and their families.

Author(s): 
Hoare, C.
Li Wan Po, A.
Williams, H.
Publication Title: 
Clinical and Experimental Dermatology

This review provides a summary of key findings from 22 systematic reviews on atopic eczema (AE) published over the 2-year period from January 2012 to 31 December 2013, focusing on prevention and treatment of AE. For an update of systematic reviews on the epidemiology, mechanisms of disease and methodological issues, see Part 1 of this update. Based on current systematic review evidence, the most promising intervention for the prevention of AE is the use of probiotics (and possibly prebiotics) during the late stages of pregnancy and early life.

Author(s): 
Madhok, V.
Futamura, M.
Thomas, K. S.
Barbarot, S.
Publication Title: 
Clinics in Dermatology

The term complementary or alternative medicine encompasses numerous diverse therapeutic concepts, ranging from as herbal medicine, diet with essential fatty acids, and probiotics, to acupuncture. The main focus of these treatment methods is inflammatory skin disease, in particular atopic dermatitis. Although integrative medicine enjoys increasing popularity, particularly in industrialized countries, clinical studies that meet the double-blind, placebo-controlled standard are rare or nonexistent. The aim of this contribution is to provide the various concepts of integrative medicine.

Author(s): 
Boneberger, Susanne
Rupec, Rudolf A.
Ruzicka, Thomas
Publication Title: 
Clinics in Dermatology

The term complementary or alternative medicine encompasses numerous diverse therapeutic concepts, ranging from as herbal medicine, diet with essential fatty acids, and probiotics, to acupuncture. The main focus of these treatment methods is inflammatory skin disease, in particular atopic dermatitis. Although integrative medicine enjoys increasing popularity, particularly in industrialized countries, clinical studies that meet the double-blind, placebo-controlled standard are rare or nonexistent. The aim of this contribution is to provide the various concepts of integrative medicine.

Author(s): 
Boneberger, Susanne
Rupec, Rudolf A.
Ruzicka, Thomas
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has been increasingly used for atopic eczema. A previous version of this Cochrane review published in 2004 found some evidence of a possible benefit for oral ingestion of CHM for eczema, but the results were inconclusive and the evidence needs to be updated. We have expanded the scope of this review to include an assessment of the topical and oral effects of CHM for eczema. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of oral ingestion and topical applications of CHM for the management of eczema in children and adults.

Author(s): 
Gu, Sherman
Yang, Angela W. H.
Xue, Charlie C. L.
Li, Chun G.
Pang, Carmen
Zhang, Weiya
Williams, Hywel C.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Clinical Dermatology

BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative interventions are becoming increasingly utilized as adjuncts to conventional treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD). While the number of studies continues to grow, the vastness of the subject coupled with the relatively poor quality and small size of the studies limit their usefulness to clinicians. PURPOSE: Our aim was to comprehensively review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of complementary and alternative therapies for AD.

Author(s): 
Vieira, Brittany L.
Lim, Neil R.
Lohman, Mary E.
Lio, Peter A.

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