Disease Models, Animal

Publication Title: 
Phytotherapy research: PTR

There is documented evidence of the use of Terminalia chebula for various ailments in the Ayurvedic literature. The extract has been shown to possess glucose lowering activity and to improve insulin sensitivity in animal models of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present study was carried out to study the dose response relationship of this extract in a rat model of metabolic syndrome. Six groups of rats were fed a high fructose diet (HFD) for a period of 20 days to induce metabolic syndrome. Three doses of fruit extract of T.

Author(s): 
Singh, Inderjeet
Singh, Pawan Kumar
Bhansali, Shobhit
Shafiq, Nusrat
Malhotra, Samir
Pandhi, Promila
Pal Singh, Amrit
Publication Title: 
Inflammopharmacology

The present study has evaluated the healing effects of extract of dried fruit pulp of Terminalia chebula (TCE) on acetic acid (AA)-induced colitis in rats. TCE (600 mg/kg) showed healing effects against AA-induced colonic damage score and weight when administered orally daily for 14 days. TCE was further studied for its effects on various physical (mucus/blood in stool and stool frequency, food and water intake and body weight changes), histology, antibacterial activity and free radicals (NO and LPO), antioxidants (SOD, CAT and GSH) and myeloperoxidase in colonic tissue.

Author(s): 
Gautam, M. K.
Goel, Shalini
Ghatule, R. R.
Singh, A.
Nath, G.
Goel, R. K.
Publication Title: 
Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology

In continuation of our drug discovery program on Indian medicinal plants, the gastro protective mechanism of chebulinic acid isolated from Terminalia chebula fruit was investigated. Chebulinic acid was evaluated against cold restraint (CRU), aspirin (AS), alcohol (AL) and pyloric ligation (PL) induced gastric ulcer models in rats. Potential anti-ulcer activity of chebulinic acid was observed against CRU (62.9%), AS (55.3%), AL (80.67%) and PL (66.63%) induced ulcer models.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Vaibhav
Agrawal, Manali
Onasanwo, Samuel Adetunji
Madhur, Gaurav
Rastogi, Preeti
Pandey, Haushila Prasad
Palit, Gautam
Narender, Tadigoppula
Publication Title: 
Pharmaceutical Biology

CONTEXT: Arthritis is inflammation of one or more joints. Terminalia chebula Retz. (Combretaceae) fruit is mentioned in Ayurveda as useful in treating arthritic disorders. OBJECTIVE: This work was undertaken to evaluate the anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-lipid peroxidative and membrane-stabilizing effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Terminalia chebula fruits and also to establish a possible association between them. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In vivo anti-inflammatory activity of T. chebula fruit extract at different doses ranged from 50 to 500?mg/kg, p.o.

Author(s): 
Bag, Anwesa
Kumar Bhattacharyya, Subir
Kumar Pal, Nishith
Ranjan Chattopadhyay, Rabi
Publication Title: 
Mycoses

Dermatophytes are the most common causative agents of cutaneous mycosis and remain a major public health problem in spite of the availability of an increasing number of antifungal drugs. It was, therefore considered necessary to pursue the screening of different extracts (compounds) of selected traditional medicinal plants reportedly having antidermatophyte potential. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify specific compound from the most active extract (free flavonoid) of stem of Terminalia chebula of the selected plants to treat dermatophytosis induced on experimental mice.

Author(s): 
Singh, Geeta
Kumar, Padma
Joshi, Suresh Chandra
Publication Title: 
Pharmaceutical Biology

Context Chebulae Fructus is used as an herbal remedy for diarrhoea in traditional Chinese medicine. However, there is no scientific evidence to support its antidiarrhoeal activity. Objective This study evaluates the antidiarrhoeal properties of Chebulae Fructus aqueous extract (CFAE) and determines the active fraction. Materials and methods The antidiarrhoeal effect of CFAE (200-800?mg/kg) was investigated by determining the wet dropping, intestinal transit in BALB/c mice and enteropooling in Wister rats.

Author(s): 
Sheng, Zunlai
Yan, Xin
Zhang, Ruili
Ni, Huilin
Cui, Yuanxu
Ge, Junwei
Shan, Anshan
Publication Title: 
Mutation Research

During the course of normal respiration, reactive oxygen species are produced which are particularly detrimental to mitochondrial function. This is shown by recent studies with a mouse that lacks the mitochondrial form of superoxide dismutase (Sod2). Tissues that are heavily dependent on mitochondrial function such as the brain and heart are most severely affected in the Sod2 mutant mouse.

Author(s): 
Melov, S.
Coskun, P. E.
Wallace, D. C.
Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

In investigating the role of metal ions in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease, we examined the effects of clioquinol, a metal-binding compound currently in clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease treatment, on mutant huntingtin-expressing cells. We found that PC12 cells expressing polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin exon 1 accumulated less mutant protein and showed decreased cell death when treated with clioquinol. This effect was polyglutamine-length-specific and did not alter mRNA levels or protein degradation rates.

Author(s): 
Nguyen, Trent
Hamby, Aaron
Massa, Stephen M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Neurochemistry

The search for effective treatments that prevent oxidative stress associated with premature ageing and neurodegenerative diseases is an important area of neurochemical research. As age- and disease-related oxidative stress is frequently associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, amphiphilic antioxidant agents of high stability and selectivity that target these organelles can provide on-site protection.

Author(s): 
Poeggeler, Burkhard
Durand, GrÈgory
Polidori, Ange
Pappolla, Miguel A.
Vega-Naredo, Ignacio
Coto-Montes, Ana
Bˆker, Jutta
Hardeland, R¸diger
Pucci, Bernard
Publication Title: 
Journal of the Neurological Sciences

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive disease which is caused by degeneration of motor neurons in the central nervous system. The incidence of ALS is higher in men than women, but the female advantage disappears with increased age. Here, we report evidence that the female advantage is due to the protective role of estrogen. In an ALS mouse model carrying the human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (hSOD1) G93A transgene, ovariectomy did not alter the onset age of the disease while reducing the female lifespan by 7 days and making it comparable to that of the male transgenic mice.

Author(s): 
Choi, Chan-Il
Lee, Young-Don
Gwag, Byoung Joo
Cho, Sung Ig
Kim, Sung-Soo
Suh-Kim, Haeyoung

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