DNA Fingerprinting

Publication Title: 
Molecular Biology Reports

Terminalia trees are being over-exploited because of their medicinal and economical importance leading to loss of valuable genetic resources. For sustainable utilization and conservation, assessment of genetic diversity therefore becomes imperative. We report a comprehensive first study on estimation and analysis of genetic variation through Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), inter simple sequence repeat polymorphism (ISSR) and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) across three species of Terminalia.

Author(s): 
Sarwat, Maryam
Das, Sandip
Srivastava, Prem S.
Publication Title: 
Experimental Cell Research

The lifespan of human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF5), cultured under standard in vitro conditions (including ambient atmospheric oxygen tension), was extended slightly by expression of exogenous mortalin (mot-2)/mthsp70/Grp75, but not by the catalytic subunit of telomerase, hTERT. Together, mot-2 and hTERT permitted bypass of senescence, a substantial extension of lifespan, and possibly immortalization. This is the first demonstration that mot-2 and telomerase can cooperate in the immortalization process.

Author(s): 
Kaul, Sunil C.
Yaguchi, Tomoko
Taira, Kazunari
Reddel, Roger R.
Wadhwa, Renu
Publication Title: 
Archives of General Psychiatry

CONTEXT: Neuronal dysfunction in cerebral cortex and other brain regions could contribute to the cognitive and behavioral defects in autism. OBJECTIVE: To characterize epigenetic signatures of autism in prefrontal cortex neurons. DESIGN: We performed fluorescence-activated sorting and separation of neuronal and nonneuronal nuclei from postmortem prefrontal cortex, digested the chromatin with micrococcal nuclease, and deeply sequenced the DNA from the mononucleosomes with trimethylated H3K4 (H3K4me3), a histone mark associated with transcriptional regulation.

Author(s): 
Shulha, Hennady P.
Cheung, Iris
Whittle, Catheryne
Wang, Jie
Virgil, Daniel
Lin, Cong L.
Guo, Yin
Lessard, Andree
Akbarian, Schahram
Weng, Zhiping
Publication Title: 
Gene

To determine if ethanol consumption and alcoholism cause global DNA methylation disturbances, we examined alcoholics and controls using methylation specific microarrays to detect all annotated gene and non-coding microRNA promoters and their CpG islands. DNA was isolated and immunoprecipitated from the frontal cortex of 10 alcoholics and 10 age and gender-matched controls then labeled prior to co-hybridization. A modified Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to predict differentially enriched regions (peaks) from log-ratio estimates of amplified vs input DNA.

Author(s): 
Manzardo, A. M.
Henkhaus, R. S.
Butler, M. G.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

We evaluated the influence of pfmdr1 mutations and copy number on in vitro artemether and lumefantrine sensitivity in 101 laboratory and adapted Thai isolates of Plasmodium falciparum. Approximately one-fourth of these isolates exhibited reduced lumefantrine susceptibility. We found that both mutations and amplification of the pfmdr1 gene influenced in vitro artemether and lumefantrine sensitivity. Using multivariate analysis, 184F or 1042N alleles and a copy number of ? 4 were identified as the independent markers for decreased lumefantrine susceptibility.

Author(s): 
Mungthin, Mathirut
Khositnithikul, Rommanee
Sitthichot, Naruemon
Suwandittakul, Nantana
Wattanaveeradej, Veerachai
Ward, Stephen A.
Na-Bangchang, Kesara
Publication Title: 
Malaria Journal

BACKGROUND: Drug resistance to anti-malarials is a major public health problem worldwide. This study aimed at establishing the efficacy of artemether-lumefantrine (ACT) in Igombe-Mwanza, north-western Tanzania after a few years of ACT use, and establish the prevalence of mutations in key targets for artemisinin, chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimetamine (SP) drugs. METHODS: A prospective single cohort study was conducted at Igombe health centre using artemether-lumefantrine combination therapy between February 2010 and March 2011.

Author(s): 
Kamugisha, Erasmus
Jing, Sun
Minde, Mercy
Kataraihya, Johaness
Kongola, Gilbert
Kironde, Fred
Swedberg, Göte
Publication Title: 
Planta Medica

Twenty-four herbal dietary supplement powder and extract reference standards provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) were investigated using three different commercially available DNA extraction kits to evaluate DNA availability for downstream nucleotide-based applications. The material included samples of Camellia, Citrus, Ephedra, Ginkgo, Hypericum, Serenoa, And Vaccinium. Protocols from Qiagen, MoBio, and Phytopure were used to isolate and purify DNA from the NIST standards. The resulting DNA concentration was quantified using SYBR Green fluorometry.

Author(s): 
Cimino, Matthew T.
Publication Title: 
Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin

Kuma-zasa is Japanese folk medicine derived from plants of genus Sasa, family Bambusaceae. Although the plants of origin of Kuma-zasa were reported to be Sasa palmata, S. senanensis, S. yahikoensis, and S. kurilensis, authentication of those plants was difficult because of similarity in morphology. Several methods for the classification of genus Sasa are available, but none involve a genetic approach. Here, we performed the genetic profiling of genus Sasa, including the four species used medicinally.

Author(s): 
Sasaki, Yohei
Komatsu, Katsuko
Takido, Michio
Takeshita, Kazuo
Kashiwagi, Harutsugu
Nagumo, Seiji
Publication Title: 
PloS One

Echinacea, native to the Canadian prairies and the prairie states of the United States, has a long tradition as a folk medicine for the Native Americans. Currently, Echinacea are among the top 10 selling herbal medicines in the U.S. and Europe, due to increasing popularity for the treatment of common cold and ability to stimulate the immune system. However, the genetic relationship within the species of this genus is unclear, making the authentication of the species used for the medicinal industry more difficult.

Author(s): 
Olarte, Alexandra
Mantri, Nitin
Nugent, Gregory
Pang, Edwin C. K.
Publication Title: 
Planta Medica

Twenty-four herbal dietary supplement powder and extract reference standards provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) were investigated using three different commercially available DNA extraction kits to evaluate DNA availability for downstream nucleotide-based applications. The material included samples of Camellia, Citrus, Ephedra, Ginkgo, Hypericum, Serenoa, And Vaccinium. Protocols from Qiagen, MoBio, and Phytopure were used to isolate and purify DNA from the NIST standards. The resulting DNA concentration was quantified using SYBR Green fluorometry.

Author(s): 
Cimino, Matthew T.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - DNA Fingerprinting