Family Practice

Publication Title: 
Australian Family Physician

Clinical hypnosis is now an available tool for general practitioners. Hypnotists do not possess any magical powers. It is the patient who possess the magic; the hypnotist merely unlocks this power.

Author(s): 
Wong, M.
Burrows, G.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Canadian physicians' opinions about alternative medicine have, as yet, not been assessed. The objectives of this pilot study were to assess general practitioners': (1) desired involvement in alternative medicine; (2) perceived demand for alternative medicine; and (3) beliefs about the efficacy of different alternative approaches. The study design was a cross-sectional survey of 400 randomly selected Alberta and Ontario general practitioners. Of the 384 eligible physicians, 200 (52%) completed the questionnaire.

Author(s): 
Verhoef, M. J.
Sutherland, L. R.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Board of Family Practice / American Board of Family Practice

BACKGROUND: A survey exploring attitudes toward complementary or alternative medicine was distributed to 295 family physicians in the Chesapeake region. Physicians were asked about their knowledge, usage of, and training in complementary therapies and what evidence they expected of complementary medicine to aid in accepting these therapies. METHODS: Questionnaires were distributed at three separate conferences of family physicians with 180 physicians responding.

Author(s): 
Berman, B. M.
Singh, B. K.
Lao, L.
Singh, B. B.
Ferentz, K. S.
Hartnoll, S. M.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

Previous studies surveying attitudes and education regarding the clinical use of hypnosis have been conducted with patient populations only. The current study was undertaken to assess the attitudes, experiences, training levels, and interest in future education regarding the use of hypnosis by staff physicians, medical resident physicians, family practice outpatients, and psychiatry outpatients. All subjects were drawn from a 400-physician group practice in Central Texas affiliated with a large university health science center.

Author(s): 
Elkins, G. R.
Wall, V. J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine

Complementary therapy (CT) has become increasingly popular with the general public and interest from the health professions has been rising. There has been no study focusing on the pattern of availability of CT within urban and inner-city general practice. We aimed to describe the prevalence and pattern of access to complementary therapy in this setting, identifying the characteristics of practices offering CT and the perceived barriers to service provision. We sent a postal questionnaire to all 254 general practices on the Birmingham Family Health Services Authority list.

Author(s): 
Wearn, A. M.
Greenfield, S. M.
Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Australia

OBJECTIVES: To describe Victorian general practitioners' attitudes towards and use of a range of complementary therapies. DESIGN: A self-administered postal survey sent to a random sample of 800 general practitioners (GPs) in Victoria in July 1997. PARTICIPANTS: 488 GPs (response rate, 64%). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: GPs' knowledge; opinions about harmfulness and effectiveness; appropriateness for GPs to practise; perceived patient demand; need for undergraduate education; referral rates to complementary practitioners; and training in and practice of each therapy.

Author(s): 
Pirotta, M. V.
Cohen, M. M.
Kotsirilos, V.
Farish, S. J.
Publication Title: 
Australian Family Physician

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to identify the knowledge, attitudes and referral patterns of general practitioners (GPs) toward 10 specific complementary therapies. METHOD: The study was a descriptive cross-sectional postal survey, conducted between July 1998 and August 1998 inclusive. A random selection of 200 male and 200 female Western Australian GPs residing in Perth and listed in the Australian Medical Association database file of registered GPs. RESULTS: The response rate was 74.8% (n = 282).

Author(s): 
Hall, K.
Giles-Corti, B.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVES: Assessing the extent to which general practitioners (GPs) accept complementary therapies as normal medical practice. DESIGN: An examination of two Australian surveys of GPs undertaken in Tasmania and Victoria in 1997. OUTCOME MEASURES: Type of referral (to doctors or non-medical therapists) and therapy. Levels of acceptance. Basis for judgement of acceptability. RESULTS: In Tasmania 66% of GPs referred patients to doctors - primarily for acupuncture and hypnotherapy.

Author(s): 
Easthope, G.
Tranter, B.
Gill, G.
Publication Title: 
The British Journal of General Practice: The Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners

BACKGROUND: The popularity of complementary medicine continues to be asserted by the professional associations and umbrella organisations of these therapies. Within conventional medicine there are also signs that attitudes towards some of the complementary therapies are changing. AIM: To describe the scale and scope of access to complementary therapies (acupuncture, chiropractic, homoeopathy, hypnotherapy, medical herbalism, and osteopathy) via general practice in England.

Author(s): 
Thomas, K. J.
Nicholl, J. P.
Fall, M.
Publication Title: 
MMW Fortschritte der Medizin
Author(s): 
Häuser, W.

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