Family Practice

Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

METHODS: Australian general practitioners' (GPs) attitudes toward and use of a range of complementary therapies (CTs) were determined through a self-administered postal survey sent to a random sample of 2000 Australian GPs. The survey canvassed GPs' opinions as to the harmfulness and effectiveness of CTs; current levels of training and interest in further training; personal use of, and use in practice of, CTs; referrals to CT; practitioners; appropriateness for GPs to practice and for government regulation; perceived patient demand and the need for undergraduate education.

Author(s): 
Cohen, Marc M.
Penman, Stephen
Pirotta, Marie
Da Costa, Cliff
Publication Title: 
The British Journal of General Practice: The Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners

BACKGROUND: In western populations irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects between 10% and 30% of the population and has a significant effect on quality of life. It generates a substantial workload in both primary and secondary care and has significant cost implications. Gut-directed hypnotherapy has been demonstrated to alleviate symptoms and improve quality of life but has not been assessed outside of secondary and tertiary referral centres. AIM: To assess the effectiveness of gut-directed hypnotherapy as a complementary therapy in the management of IBS.

Author(s): 
Roberts, Lesley
Wilson, Sue
Singh, Sukhdev
Roalfe, Andrea
Greenfield, Sheila
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Epidemiology

OBJECTIVE: To determine the extent to which smoking cessation interventions are used in the community and their relative success in older women. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective cohort study located in 23 general practices in England, Scotland. and Wales and including 3,622 women aged 60 to 79 years at recruitment from the British Women's Heart and Health Study. RESULTS: Of the 370 smokers at baseline, 77 (21%) had stopped smoking at 3 years, reducing the prevalence of smoking from 10.2% to 8.8%.

Author(s): 
Schroeder, Knut
Lawlor, Debbie A.
Montaner, David
Ebrahim, Shah
Publication Title: 
BMC musculoskeletal disorders

BACKGROUND: Hypnosis treatment in general practice is a rather new concept. This pilot study was performed to evaluate the effect of a standardized hypnosis treatment used in general practice for patients with chronic widespread pain (CWP). METHODS: The study was designed as a randomized control group-controlled study. Sixteen patients were randomized into a treatment group or a control group, each constituting eight patients. Seven patients in the treatment group completed the schedule.

Author(s): 
Grøndahl, Jan Robert
Rosvold, Elin Olaug
Publication Title: 
Family Medicine
Author(s): 
Graham, Susan
Vettraino, Anthony N.
Seifeldin, Raouf
Singal, Bonita
Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Australia

OBJECTIVES: To describe Victorian general practitioners' attitudes towards and use of a range of complementary therapies. DESIGN: A self-administered postal survey sent to a random sample of 800 general practitioners (GPs) in Victoria in July 1997. PARTICIPANTS: 488 GPs (response rate, 64%). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: GPs' knowledge; opinions about harmfulness and effectiveness; appropriateness for GPs to practise; perceived patient demand; need for undergraduate education; referral rates to complementary practitioners; and training in and practice of each therapy.

Author(s): 
Pirotta, M. V.
Cohen, M. M.
Kotsirilos, V.
Farish, S. J.
Publication Title: 
Australian Family Physician

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to identify the knowledge, attitudes and referral patterns of general practitioners (GPs) toward 10 specific complementary therapies. METHOD: The study was a descriptive cross-sectional postal survey, conducted between July 1998 and August 1998 inclusive. A random selection of 200 male and 200 female Western Australian GPs residing in Perth and listed in the Australian Medical Association database file of registered GPs. RESULTS: The response rate was 74.8% (n = 282).

Author(s): 
Hall, K.
Giles-Corti, B.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

METHODS: Australian general practitioners' (GPs) attitudes toward and use of a range of complementary therapies (CTs) were determined through a self-administered postal survey sent to a random sample of 2000 Australian GPs. The survey canvassed GPs' opinions as to the harmfulness and effectiveness of CTs; current levels of training and interest in further training; personal use of, and use in practice of, CTs; referrals to CT; practitioners; appropriateness for GPs to practice and for government regulation; perceived patient demand and the need for undergraduate education.

Author(s): 
Cohen, Marc M.
Penman, Stephen
Pirotta, Marie
Da Costa, Cliff
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

A retrospective audit was carried out on 58 patients with chronic health problems who were referred by 22 general practitioners (GPs) for acupuncture, aromatherapy, homeopathy, massage and osteopathy, or a combination. Costs of GP consultations, prescriptions, secondary care referrals, and diagnostic tests from records of 33 of these patients were compared pre (24 months), during (mean 4.3 months) and post (mean 5.7 months) complementary medicine (CM) treatment.

Author(s): 
Robinson, Nicola
Donaldson, Julie
Watt, Hilary
Publication Title: 
Drug and Alcohol Review

INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: This study was designed to examine the relationship between alcohol dependence and general practitioner (GP) service attendance in Australia. DESIGN AND METHODS: Data were analysed from the 1997 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing. In this survey, a representative sample of the Australian population was interviewed to ascertain past 12 month psychiatric diagnoses for all major mental disorders as well as the use of primary and other health services (n = 10 641, 79% response rate).

Author(s): 
Proudfoot, Heather
Teesson, Maree

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