Publication Title: 
Integrative Cancer Therapies

PURPOSE: To review the available literature on the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments for cancer-related fatigue with an aim to develop directions for future research. METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus were searched for relevant studies. Original clinical trials reporting on the use of CAM treatments for cancer-related fatigue were abstracted and critically reviewed.

Sood, Amit
Barton, Debra L.
Bauer, Brent A.
Loprinzi, Charles L.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Occupational Therapy: Official Publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association

This article is the first part of a systematic review of evidence for the effectiveness of cancer rehabilitation interventions within the scope of occupational therapy that address the activity and participation needs of adult cancer survivors. This article focuses on the importance of physical activity and symptom management. Strong evidence supports the use of exercise for cancer-related fatigue and indicates that lymphedema is not exacerbated by exercise.

Hunter, Elizabeth G.
Gibson, Robert W.
Arbesman, Marian
D'Amico, Mariana
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Occupational Therapy: Official Publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association

OBJECTIVE: We reviewed the efficacy of occupational therapy-related interventions for adults with rheumatoid arthritis. METHOD: We examined 51 Level I studies (19 physical activity, 32 psychoeducational) published 2000-2014 and identified from five databases. Interventions that focused solely on the upper or lower extremities were not included. RESULTS: Findings related to key outcomes (activities of daily living, ability, pain, fatigue, depression, self-efficacy, disease symptoms) are presented. Strong evidence supports the use of aerobic exercise, resistive exercise, and aquatic therapy.

Siegel, Patricia
Tencza, Melissa
Apodaca, Beverly
Poole, Janet L.
Publication Title: 
Health Technology Assessment (Winchester, England)

BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an important problem both for people with the disease and for society. There is no cure, and alleviation of symptoms forms the cornerstone of care. Excessive fatigue that severely limits activity is experienced by at least two-thirds of the estimated 60,000 people with MS in the UK. OBJECTIVES: (1) To identify current treatments for fatigue in MS and their evidence-base.

Brañas, P.
Jordan, R.
Fry-Smith, A.
Burls, A.
Hyde, C.
Publication Title: 
CA: a cancer journal for clinicians

Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited.

Greenlee, Heather
DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J.
Balneaves, Lynda G.
Carlson, Linda E.
Cohen, Misha R.
Deng, Gary
Johnson, Jillian A.
Mumber, Matthew
Seely, Dugald
Zick, Suzanna M.
Boyce, Lindsay M.
Tripathy, Debu
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Nursing

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To assess the profile, evaluation criteria and fatigue treatment. BACKGROUND: Fatigue, characterised by tiredness, weakness or lack of energy, involves physical, cognitive and emotional aspects. Its aetiology is not well defined and the prevalence ranges from 30-70% in women with breast cancer, reaching up to 80% when they are undergoing radiotherapy. This is one of the most frequent side effects of radiotherapy, and it may interfere with self-esteem, social activities and quality of life. DESIGN: Literature systematic review.

Alcântara-Silva, Tereza Raquel de M.
Freitas-Junior, Ruffo
Freitas, Nilceana M. A.
Machado, Graziela D. P.
Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise interventions on overall health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its domains among adults scheduled to, or actively undergoing, cancer treatment. DATA SOURCES: 11 electronic databases were searched through November 2011. In addition, the authors searched PubMed's related article feature, trial registries, and reference lists of included trials and related reviews. DATA SYNTHESIS: 56 trials with 4,826 participants met the inclusion criteria.

Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Snyder, Claire
Geigle, Paula
Gotay, Carolyn
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the cancer most frequently diagnosed in women worldwide. Even though survival rates are continually increasing, breast cancer is often associated with long-term psychological distress, chronic pain, fatigue and impaired quality of life. Yoga comprises advice for an ethical lifestyle, spiritual practice, physical activity, breathing exercises and meditation. It is a complementary therapy that is commonly recommended for breast cancer-related impairments and has been shown to improve physical and mental health in people with different cancer types.

Cramer, Holger
Lauche, Romy
Klose, Petra
Lange, Silke
Langhorst, Jost
Dobos, Gustav J.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing

Although yoga has been practiced in Eastern culture for thousands of years as part of life philosophy, classes in the United States only recently have been offered to people with cancer. The word yoga is derived from the Sanskrit root yuj, meaning to bind, join, and yoke. This reflection of the union of the body, mind, and spirit is what differentiates yoga from general exercise programs. Yoga classes in the United States generally consist of asanas (postures), which are designed to exercise every muscle, nerve, and gland in the body.

DiStasio, Susan A.
Publication Title: 
Integrative Cancer Therapies

Fatigue, experienced by patients during and following cancer treatment, is a significant clinical problem. It is a prevalent and distressing symptom yet pharmacological interventions are used little and confer limited benefit for patients. However, many cancer patients use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and some evidence suggests it may relieve fatigue. A systematic review was conducted to appraise the effectiveness of CAM interventions in ameliorating cancer-related fatigue.

Finnegan-John, Jennifer
Molassiotis, Alex
Richardson, Alison
Ream, Emma


Subscribe to RSS - Fatigue