Fear

Publication Title: 
The Spine Journal: Official Journal of the North American Spine Society

BACKGROUND: Seven previous systematic reviews (SRs) have evaluated back schools, and one has evaluated brief education, with the latest SR including studies until November 2004. The effectiveness of fear-avoidance training has not been assessed. PURPOSE: To assess the effectiveness of back schools, brief education, and fear-avoidance training for chronic low back pain (CLBP). STUDY DESIGN: A SR. METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE database of randomized controlled trials (RCT) until August 2006 for relevant trials reported in English.

Author(s): 
Brox, J. I.
Storheim, K.
Grotle, M.
Tveito, T. H.
Indahl, A.
Eriksen, H. R.
Publication Title: 
Age and Ageing

OBJECTIVE: to determine the effect of exercise interventions on fear of falling in community-living people aged ?65. DESIGN: systematic review and meta-analysis. Bibliographic databases, trial registers and other sources were searched for randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Data were independently extracted by pairs of reviewers using a standard form. RESULTS: thirty trials (2,878 participants) reported 36 interventions (Tai Chi and yoga (n = 9); balance training (n = 19); strength and resistance training (n = 8)). The risk of bias was low in few trials.

Author(s): 
Kumar, Arun
Delbaere, Kim
Zijlstra, G. a. R.
Carpenter, Hannah
Iliffe, Steve
Masud, Tahir
Skelton, Dawn
Morris, Richard
Kendrick, Denise
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Fear of falling is common in older people and associated with serious physical and psychosocial consequences. Exercise (planned, structured, repetitive and purposive physical activity aimed at improving physical fitness) may reduce fear of falling by improving strength, gait, balance and mood, and reducing the occurrence of falls. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects (benefits, harms and costs) of exercise interventions for reducing fear of falling in older people living in the community.

Author(s): 
Kendrick, Denise
Kumar, Arun
Carpenter, Hannah
Zijlstra, G. A. Rixt
Skelton, Dawn A.
Cook, Juliette R.
Stevens, Zoe
Belcher, Carolyn M.
Haworth, Deborah
Gawler, Sheena J.
Gage, Heather
Masud, Tahir
Bowling, Ann
Pearl, Mirilee
Morris, Richard W.
Iliffe, Steve
Delbaere, Kim
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To examine the feasibility and benefits of the Merging Yoga and Occupational Therapy (MY-OT) intervention. DESIGN: This is the primary analysis of a non-controlled pretest-posttest pilot study to understand the feasibility and impact of MY-OT on balance, balance self-efficacy, and fall risk factor management in people with chronic stroke. SETTING: University research laboratory.

Author(s): 
Schmid, Arlene A.
Puymbroeck, Marieke Van
Portz, Jennifer D.
Atler, Karen E.
Fruhauf, Christine A.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To examine the feasibility and benefits of the Merging Yoga and Occupational Therapy (MY-OT) intervention. DESIGN: This is the primary analysis of a non-controlled pretest-posttest pilot study to understand the feasibility and impact of MY-OT on balance, balance self-efficacy, and fall risk factor management in people with chronic stroke. SETTING: University research laboratory.

Author(s): 
Schmid, Arlene A.
Puymbroeck, Marieke Van
Portz, Jennifer D.
Atler, Karen E.
Fruhauf, Christine A.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Nursing

BACKGROUND: The emotion of disgust appears to promote psychological and behavioral avoidance, a dynamic that has significant implications in physical and psychological outcomes in colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients, caregivers, and health professionals alike are all potentially susceptible to responding with disgust and the associated avoidance. OBJECTIVE: This article aimed to review the early-stage literature related to disgust and CRC, consider the clinical implications, and suggest an appropriate research agenda.

Author(s): 
Reynolds, Lisa M.
Consedine, Nathan S.
Pizarro, David A.
Bissett, Ian P.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing

BACKGROUND: Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is one of the largest unmet needs in the breast cancer survivor population. This review addresses this unmet need with the question. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this article is to better understand potential interventions to manage FCR when caring for breast cancer survivors. METHODS: Databases used were PubMed, CINAHL®, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Scopus.

Author(s): 
Dawson, Gretchen
Madsen, Lydia T.
Dains, Joyce E.
Publication Title: 
Explore (New York, N.Y.)

CONTEXT: Although acupuncture and homeopathy both have a theoretical background that refers to immaterial forces difficult to verify, they are nevertheless used and accepted as effective treatments by many individuals. OBJECTIVE: We intended to investigate whether and how users of acupuncture and homeopathy differ with respect to sociodemographic data, adaptive coping strategies, and attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

Author(s): 
Büssing, Arndt
Ostermann, Thomas
Raak, Christa
Matthiessen, Peter F.
Publication Title: 
Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews

Anxiety disorders increase risk for the early development of several diseases of aging. Elevated inflammation, a common risk factor across diseases of aging, may play a key role in the relationship between anxiety and physical disease. However, the neurobiological mechanisms linking anxiety with elevated inflammation remain unclear. In this review, we present a neurobiological model of the mechanisms by which anxiety promotes inflammation.

Author(s): 
O'Donovan, Aoife
Slavich, George M.
Epel, Elissa S.
Neylan, Thomas C.
Publication Title: 
Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior

In anxiety disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorders and phobias, classical conditioning pairs natural (unconditioned) fear-eliciting stimuli with contextual or discrete cues resulting in enduring fear responses to multiple stimuli. Extinction is an active learning process that results in a reduction of conditioned fear responses after conditioned stimuli are no longer paired with unconditioned stimuli. Fear extinction often produces incomplete effects and this highlights the relative permanence of bonds between conditioned stimuli and conditioned fear responses.

Author(s): 
Kaplan, Gary B.
Moore, Katherine A.

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