Female

Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: A growing number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have investigated the therapeutic value of yoga interventions. This bibliometric analysis aimed to provide a comprehensive review of the characteristics of the totality of available randomized yoga trials. METHODS: All RCTs of yoga were eligible. Medline/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, IndMED, and the tables of content of yoga specialty journals not listed in medical databases were screened through February 2014. Bibliometric data, data on participants, and intervention were extracted and analyzed descriptively.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Lauche, Romy
Dobos, Gustav
Publication Title: 
BMC psychiatry

BACKGROUND: Prenatal depression can negatively affect the physical and mental health of both mother and fetus. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of yoga as an intervention in the management of prenatal depression. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted by searching PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library and PsycINFO from all retrieved articles describing such trials up to July 2014. RESULTS: Six RCTs were identified in the systematic search.

Author(s): 
Gong, Hong
Ni, Chenxu
Shen, Xiaoliang
Wu, Tengyun
Jiang, Chunlei
Publication Title: 
Journal of Human Hypertension

Some evidence from previous randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews has demonstrated a positive association between hypertension and transcendental meditation (TM). However, other trials and reviews showed the effect of TM on blood pressure (BP) was unclear but did not use subgroup analysis to rigorously investigate this relationship. The American Heart Association has stated that TM is potentially beneficial but did not give a standard indication. The present study explored several subgroup analyses in systematic reviews to investigate the effect of TM on BP.

Author(s): 
Bai, Z.
Chang, J.
Chen, C.
Li, P.
Yang, K.
Chi, I.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Monographs

BACKGROUND: The majority of breast cancer patients use complementary and/or integrative therapies during and beyond cancer treatment to manage symptoms, prevent toxicities, and improve quality of life. Practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about safe and effective therapies. METHODS: Following the Institute of Medicine's guideline development process, a systematic review identified randomized controlled trials testing the use of integrative therapies for supportive care in patients receiving breast cancer treatment.

Author(s): 
Greenlee, Heather
Balneaves, Lynda G.
Carlson, Linda E.
Cohen, Misha
Deng, Gary
Hershman, Dawn
Mumber, Matthew
Perlmutter, Jane
Seely, Dugald
Sen, Ananda
Zick, Suzanna M.
Tripathy, Debu
Society for Integrative Oncology
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

Previous research has shown the vast mental and physical health benefits associated with yoga. Yoga practice can be divided into subcategories that include posture-holding exercise (asana), breathing (pranayama, Kriya), and meditation (Sahaj) practice. Studies measuring mental health outcomes have shown decreases in anxiety, and increases in cognitive performance after yoga interventions. Similar studies have also shown cognitive advantages amongst yoga practitioners versus non-practitioners.

Author(s): 
Desai, Radhika
Tailor, Anisha
Bhatt, Tanvi
Publication Title: 
Age and Ageing

OBJECTIVE: one-third of community-dwelling older adults fall annually. Exercise that challenges balance is proven to prevent falls. We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis to determine the impact of yoga-based exercise on balance and physical mobility in people aged 60+ years. METHODS: searches for relevant trials were conducted on the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) from inception to February 2015.

Author(s): 
Youkhana, Sabrina
Dean, Catherine M.
Wolff, Moa
Sherrington, Catherine
Tiedemann, Anne
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

To understand the role and efficacy of yoga in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus, this meta-analysis was conducted. Electronic data bases searched were PubMed/Medline, ProQuest, PsycINFO, IndMED, CENTRAL, Cochrane library, CamQuest and CamBase till December 17, 2014. Eligible outcomes were fasting blood sugar (FBS), post prandial blood sugar (PPBS) and glycosylated haemoglobin (HBA1C). Randomized controlled trials and controlled trials were eligible. Studies focussing only on relaxation or meditation or multimodal intervention were not included.

Author(s): 
Kumar, Vinod
Jagannathan, Aarti
Philip, Mariamma
Thulasi, Arun
Angadi, Praveen
Raghuram, Nagarathna
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: It is estimated that up to 75% of cancer survivors may experience cognitive impairment as a result of cancer treatment and given the increasing size of the cancer survivor population, the number of affected people is set to rise considerably in coming years. There is a need, therefore, to identify effective, non-pharmacological interventions for maintaining cognitive function or ameliorating cognitive impairment among people with a previous cancer diagnosis.

Author(s): 
Treanor, Charlene J.
McMenamin, Una C.
O'Neill, Roisin F.
Cardwell, Chris R.
Clarke, Mike J.
Cantwell, Marie
Donnelly, Michael
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To examine the feasibility and benefits of the Merging Yoga and Occupational Therapy (MY-OT) intervention. DESIGN: This is the primary analysis of a non-controlled pretest-posttest pilot study to understand the feasibility and impact of MY-OT on balance, balance self-efficacy, and fall risk factor management in people with chronic stroke. SETTING: University research laboratory.

Author(s): 
Schmid, Arlene A.
Puymbroeck, Marieke Van
Portz, Jennifer D.
Atler, Karen E.
Fruhauf, Christine A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Hypertension

OBJECTIVES: We meta-analyzed the effect of meditation on blood pressure (BP), including both transcendental meditation and non-transcendental meditation interventions. METHODS: We identified randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that examined the BP responses to meditation interventions through a systematic literature search of the PubMed, ABI/INFORM, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases (from January 1980 to October 2015). We meta-analyzed the change in SBP and DBP, stratified by type of meditation (transcendental meditation vs.

Author(s): 
Shi, Lu
Zhang, Donglan
Wang, Liang
Zhuang, Junyang
Cook, Rebecca
Chen, Liwei

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Female