Food-Drug Interactions

Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Nursing

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study sought to assess the impact of a standardized protocol to maintain nasoenteral tube (NET) patency in patients requiring fluid restriction and identify factors associated with tube patency. BACKGROUND: Nasoenteral tube obstruction may interrupt nutritional support and prohibit drug administration. Balancing NET patency in the context of fluid restriction can be a challenge. DESIGN AND METHODS: The impact of the standardized protocol was assessed by using a quasi-experimental design and an historical control.

Author(s): 
Matsuba, Claudia St
De Gutiérrez, Maria Gr
Whitaker, Iveth Y.
Publication Title: 
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy

The objective of this study was to conduct a prospective population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of lumefantrine during blinded comparisons of artemether-lumefantrine treatment regimens in uncomplicated multidrug-resistant falciparum malaria. Three combination regimens containing an average adult lumefantrine dose of 1,920 mg over 3 days (four doses) (regimen A) or 2,780 mg over 3 or 5 days (six doses) (regimen B or C, respectively) were given to 266 Thai patients.

Author(s): 
Ezzet, F.
van Vugt, M.
Nosten, F.
Looareesuwan, S.
White, N. J.
Publication Title: 
Tropical medicine & international health: TM & IH

BACKGROUND: Artemether-lumefantrine (AL) is the only fixed, artemisinin-based combination antimalarial drug which is registered internationally and deployed on a large scale. Absorption of the hydrophobic lipophilic lumefantrine component varies widely between individuals and is greatly increased by fat coadministration; but patients with acute malaria are frequently nauseated and anorexic, making dietary advice difficult to comply with.

Author(s): 
Ashley, Elizabeth A.
Stepniewska, Kasia
Lindegardh, Niklas
Annerberg, Anna
Kham, Am
Brockman, Al
Singhasivanon, Pratap
White, Nicholas J.
Nosten, François
Publication Title: 
Malaria Journal

A fixed-dose combination of artemether-lumefantrine (AL, Coartem(R)) has shown high efficacy, good tolerability and cost-effectiveness in adults and children with uncomplicated malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum. Lumefantrine bioavailability is enhanced by food, particularly fat.As the fat content of sub-Saharan African meals is approximately a third that of Western countries, it raises the question of whether fat consumption by African patients is sufficient for good efficacy.

Author(s): 
Premji, Zulfiqarali G.
Abdulla, Salim
Ogutu, Bernhards
Ndong, Alice
Falade, Catherine O.
Sagara, Issaka
Mulure, Nathan
Nwaiwu, Obiyo
Kokwaro, Gilbert
Publication Title: 
Tropical medicine & international health: TM & IH

OBJECTIVES: Artemether-lumefantrine (AL) is first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in many African countries. Concomitant food consumption may affect absorption of lumefantrine but data in the most important target population, i.e. children, are lacking. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of food intake on oral lumefantrine bioavailability in African children with malaria.

Author(s): 
Borrmann, Steffen
Sallas, William M.
Machevo, Sonia
González, Raquel
Björkman, Anders
Mårtensson, Andreas
Hamel, Mary
Juma, Elizabeth
Peshu, Judy
Ogutu, Bernhards
Djimde, Abdoulaye
D'Alessandro, Umberto
Marrast, Anne-Claire
Lefèvre, Gilbert
Kern, Steven E.
Publication Title: 
Drug Metabolism and Drug Interactions

Ayurvedic medicines are available in the market as over-the-counter products. Today people use prescription and nonprescription medicines along with Ayurvedic medicines for quick relief from ailments. In the ancient texts of Ayurveda, the concept of interactions with various examples of food interactions and food-drug interactions are mentioned. Recent studies and publications reported drug interactions of Ayurveda medicines and modern drugs.

Author(s): 
Sarkar, Prasanta Kumar
Chaudhari, Supriyo
Chattopadhyay, Abichal
Publication Title: 
Drug Metabolism and Drug Interactions

Ayurvedic medicines are available in the market as over-the-counter products. Today people use prescription and nonprescription medicines along with Ayurvedic medicines for quick relief from ailments. In the ancient texts of Ayurveda, the concept of interactions with various examples of food interactions and food-drug interactions are mentioned. Recent studies and publications reported drug interactions of Ayurveda medicines and modern drugs.

Author(s): 
Sarkar, Prasanta Kumar
Chaudhari, Supriyo
Chattopadhyay, Abichal
Publication Title: 
Expert Opinion on Drug Metabolism & Toxicology

INTRODUCTION: Since their initial discovery in 1989, grapefruit juice (GFJ)-drug interactions have received extensive interest from the scientific, medical, regulatory and lay communities. Although knowledge regarding the effects of GFJ on drug disposition continues to expand, the list of drugs studied in the clinical setting remains relatively limited. AREAS COVERED: This article reviews the in vitro effects of GFJ and its constituents on the activity of CYP enzymes, organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs), P-glycoprotein, esterases and sulfotransferases.

Author(s): 
Hanley, Michael J.
Cancalon, Paul
Widmer, Wilbur W.
Greenblatt, David J.
Publication Title: 
British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

AIM: The present study evaluated the possibility of drug interactions involving blueberry juice (BBJ) and substrate drugs whose clearance is dependent on cytochromes P4503A (CYP3A) and P4502C9 (CYP2C9). METHODS: A 50:50 mixture of lowbush and highbush BBJ was evaluated in vitro as an inhibitor of CYP3A activity (hydroxylation of triazolam and dealkylation of buspirone) and of CYP2C9 activity (flurbiprofen hydroxylation) using human liver microsomes.

Author(s): 
Hanley, Michael J.
Masse, Gina
Harmatz, Jerold S.
Cancalon, Paul F.
Dolnikowski, Gregory G.
Court, Michael H.
Greenblatt, David J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences: A Publication of the Canadian Society for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Société Canadienne Des Sciences Pharmaceutiques

Cranberry juice is a popular beverage with many health benefits. It has anthocyanins to supplement dietary needs. Based on in vitro evidence cranberry juice is an inhibitor of CYP enzymes and at higher amounts as potent as ketoconazole (CYP3A) and fluconazole (CYP2C9).

Author(s): 
Srinivas, Nuggehally R.
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