Genes, Viral

Publication Title: 
Oncogene

This study addresses the question of whether loss of p16INK4 expression contributes to the immortalization of human cells. In vitro immortalization usually proceeds through two phases. In the first phase (lifespan extension), cells continue proliferating and their telomeres continue shortening beyond the point at which normal cells become senescent. In the second phase (immortalization), the cells activate a telomere maintenance mechanism and acquire an unlimited proliferative potential.

Author(s): 
Noble, J. R.
Rogan, E. M.
Neumann, A. A.
Maclean, K.
Bryan, T. M.
Reddel, R. R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Virology

Wild-type Indiana virus transcribed four 11- to 14-nucleotide-long, 5' N-gene mRNA sequences in vitro. The amount of oligonucleotides synthesized relative to leader by wild-type virions varied inversely with the salt concentration of the transcription reaction. Reduced oligonucleotide synthesis by nucleocapsids at all salt concentrations tested and a comparison of the proteins remaining bound to the template of nucleocapsids and virions transcribed in different NaCl concentrations suggested that the matrix (M) protein regulates oligonucleotide synthesis.

Author(s): 
Pinney, D. F.
Emerson, S. U.
Publication Title: 
Virology

We report the construction of a poliovirus genome [pPVM-VPg(3F4A)] harboring a double mutation in VPg. This mutant, in which the tyrosine and the threonine at residues 3 and 4 of the VPg region were replaced by phenylalanine and alanine, respectively, is lethal, that is, all RNA synthesis was abolished and no revertants could be isolated.

Author(s): 
Cao, X.
Wimmer, E.
Publication Title: 
The EMBO journal

Amongst the picornaviruses, poliovirus encodes a single copy of the genome-linked protein, VPg wheras foot-and-mouth disease virus uniquely encodes three copies of VPg. We have previously shown that a genetically engineered poliovirus genome containing two tandemly arranged VPgs is quasi-infectious (qi) that, upon genome replication, inadvertently deleted one complete VPg sequence. Using two genetically marked viral genomes with two VPg sequences, we now provide evidence that this deletion occurs via homologous recombination.

Author(s): 
Cao, X.
Wimmer, E.
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