Health Care and Public Health

Publication Title: 
Archives of Internal Medicine

The principal motive for organ donation in the United States remains altruism. Surveys suggest that if the life-threatening and critical shortage of cadaveric donor organs were appropriately understood by the public, an altruistic response would lead to increased donation. However, despite intense educational efforts appealing to altruism, cadaveric organ donation has not increased substantially while the number of patients in need of a life-saving organ has grown markedly.

Author(s): 
Peters, T. G.
Kittur, D. S.
McGaw, L. J.
Roy MR 1st, null
Nelson, E. W.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Ethics

Existing arguments against paid organ donation are examined and found to be unconvincing. It is argued that the real reason why organ sale is generally thought to be wrong is that (a) bodily integrity is highly valued and (b) the removal of healthy organs constitutes a violation of this integrity. Both sale and (free) donation involve a violation of bodily integrity. In the case of the latter, though, the disvalue of the violation is typically outweighed by the presence of other goods: chiefly, the extreme altruism involved in the giving.

Author(s): 
Wilkinson, S.
Garrard, E.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Nursing Studies

The word altruism is derived from the Latin alteri huic meaning to this other and literally means to express a regard for others as a principle for action. Fung (1988) [JAMA, Vol. 260, No. 17, p. 2509] describes altruism as caring for no obvious reward other than the belief that someone else will benefit or avoid harm. Altruism represents an amalgamation of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which either permit or coerce individuals to take responsibility for or care for another and to sacrifice things dearly held.

Author(s): 
Gormley, K. J.
Publication Title: 
Bone Marrow Transplantation

The attitudes of 463 potential bone marrow donors toward blood donation, kidney donation in life, organ donation after death, autopsy, and donation of the whole body for anatomic dissection were surveyed, using a questionnaire that had previously been employed for assessing the attitudes of the public. The response rate was 96%. Three quarters of the respondents were blood donors and recruited via the blood center. The proportion that accepted the procedures varied between 24% for anatomic dissection and 97% for autopsy.

Author(s): 
Sanner, M. A.
Publication Title: 
British Medical Bulletin

As organ transplantation is physically possible within a tension between common biological properties and individual immunities, so it is ethically possible within a tension between individual personality in full integrity and the human community of which each member, social by nature, is an organic part. Ethical donation is by consent, explicit or presumed, spontaneously offered or procured by request. Altruism or commercial dealing is now a live issue in organ procurement, whether cadaveric or by live donation, related or unrelated.

Author(s): 
Dunstan, G. R.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Kidney Diseases: The Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation

Offering financial incentives to families of brain-dead individuals has been proposed as a way to increase the supply of organs for transplantation. However, such incentives may lead to weakening of altruism and exploitation of poor families. We investigated dialysis patient attitudes toward the potential benefits and problems of incentives. Using a structured questionnaire, we interviewed 60 randomly selected patients at three chronic hemodialysis units. Subjects were asked to make an explicit trade-off between maintaining altruism versus increasing the supply of kidneys.

Author(s): 
Sehgal, A. R.
LeBeau, S. O.
Youngner, S. J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Ethics

There has been a troublesome anomaly in the UK between cash payment to men for sperm donation and the effective assumption that women will pay to donate eggs. Some commentators, including Donald Evans in this journal, have argued that the anomaly should be resolved by treating women on the same terms as men. But this argument ignores important difficulties about property in the body, particularly in relation to gametes.

Author(s): 
Dickenson, D. L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Women's Health

Promising clinical results suggest that umbilical cord blood (UCB) collected after delivery of a child may have many advantages over bone marrow for transplantation. As there are an increasing number of options regarding the collection of UCB, including private and public banking, more pregnant women are likely to be asked to make decisions about UCB collection. We conducted three focus groups with pregnant women to learn about their perspectives on this emerging technology. All the women in these focus groups indicated that they would choose to have UCB collected.

Author(s): 
Sugarman, J.
Kaplan, L.
Cogswell, B.
Olson, J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Ethics

In line with article 3.4 of EC directive 89/381, Keown has presented an ethical case in support of the policy of voluntary, unpaid donation of blood. Although no doubt is cast on the desirability of the policy, that part of Keown's argument which pertains to the suggested laudability of altruism and of its encouragment by social policy is examined and shown to be dubious.

Author(s): 
McLachlan, H. V.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

Worldwide ethical considerations have led to banning markets for human organs and to promoting supply of organs for transplantation strictly on a donor noncommercial basis. In most industrialized countries, including France, there is a shortage of organs available for transplantation. Following on the earlier debate between Titmuss and Arrow over banning the market for blood supply, this presentation first challenges the conventional economic view that the ban is necessarily responsible for these critical shortages.

Author(s): 
Moatti, J. P.

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