Hospitals, Religious

Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Though "good people' are important for the life of any organization, it is a myth to think that enough good people will make for a good organization. To break free of this myth, a health care organization, which is made up of numerous persons and groups, ought to be regarded as a single, unitary actor in society. When seen as a single actor, the organization's systems for carrying out its mission can be better assessed and improved if necessary. If the organization's systems are not functioning as they should, then even good people will be hindered in their efforts.

Author(s): 
Ozar, David T.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Establishing an organizational ethics committee (OEC) involves careful reflection on the needs of the organization and on the people who will serve on the committee. With concern for the "community of care" (the women and men who carry out the organization's mission), a comprehensive needs assessment will reveal areas of the organization where more education and policy analyses are needed.

Author(s): 
Sister Patricia A Talone, null
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

To a great extent, the continued success of Catholic health care organizations is dependent on the selection of co-workers and leaders who are committed to carrying on the organization's mission. The Sisters of Mercy Health System, St. Louis, uses three tools to help leaders be more consistent and objective in assessing employment candidates for organizational fit. The first tool involves behavioral-based interviewing, which looks at a candidate's potential for future behaviors based on his or her past behaviors.

Author(s): 
O'Toole, Brian
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Establishing and maintaining institutional identity is a challenge for leaders in Catholic health care. A process known as "progressive articulation" can be used to help leaders assess how well their organizations reflect Catholic social tradition and help them apply this tradition toward specific organizational practices.

Author(s): 
Brinkmann, Bill
Maines, T. Dean
Naughton, Michael J.
Stebbins, J. Michael
Weimerskirch, Arnold
Publication Title: 
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety

BACKGROUND: Eliminating nosocomial infections was identified as one of eight priorities for action for Ascension Health. St. John Hospital and Medical Center (SJHMC), and St. Vincent's Hospital (STV), designated alpha sites, developed best practices for the prevention of catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSIs) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), respectively.

Author(s): 
Berriel-Cass, Dorine
Adkins, Frank W.
Jones, Polly
Fakih, Mohamad G.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

In this article, the place and the nature of an ethical dialogue that develops within Christian healthcare institutions in Flanders, Belgium is examined. More specifically, the question is asked how Christian healthcare institutions should position themselves ethically in a context of a pluralistic society. The profile developed by Caritas Catholica Flanders must take seriously not only the external pluralistic context of our society and the internal pluralistic worldviews by personnel/employees and patients, but also the inherent inspiration of a Christian healthcare institution.

Author(s): 
Gastmans, Chris
Van Neste, Fernand
Schotsmans, Paul
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

Health care institutions, including Roman Catholic institutions, are in a time of crisis. This crisis may provide an important opportunity to reinvigorate Roman Catholic health care. The current health care crisis offers Roman Catholic health care institutions a special opportunity to rethink their fundamental commitments and to plan for the future. The author argues that what Catholic health care institutions must first do is articulate the nature of their identity and their commitments.

Author(s): 
Zimbelman, J.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

In looking to the future of sponsored ministry of Catholic institutions, the formation of future sponsors--both religious and lay alike--is an important issue. As this ministry continues to evolve, and sponsoring groups determine how best to prepare new sponsors, might it not be time to think about how to pool the ministry's collective wisdom on formation? Sponsors act not only in the name of the health care institution (or other ministry) but on behalf of the faith community engaged in continuing the compassionate healing ministry of Jesus.

Author(s): 
Sr Teresa Stanley, null
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Two Catholic health systems, the Daughters of Charity National Health System and the Sisters of St. Joseph Health System, came together to create St. Louis-based Ascension Health in 1999. A third organization, Carondelet Health System, then merged with Ascension Health in December 2002. Ascension Health is sponsored by four provinces of the Daughters of Charity, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Nazareth, and the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet.

Author(s): 
Sr Barbara A Moore, null
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Though the term "sponsorship" is not used in the Code of Canon Law, it is generally accepted today that "sponsorship" entails the use of a particular name and the exercise of certain responsibilities that arise from this use. A person's good name--whether the "person" is an individual or a group--is of primary importance today; and sponsorship responsibilities are exercised in relation to what the name stands for.

Author(s): 
Fr Francis G Morrisey, null

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