Mood Disorders

Publication Title: 
Psycho-Oncology

BACKGROUND. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to investigate the efficacy of classical massage treatment in reducing breast cancer-related symptoms and in improving mood disturbances. METHODS. Women diagnosed with primary breast cancer were randomized into an intervention group and a control group. For a period of 5 weeks, the intervention group received bi-weekly 30-min classical massages in the back and head-neck areas. The control group received no additional treatment to their routine healthcare.

Author(s): 
Listing, Miriam
Reisshauer, Anett
Krohn, Michaela
Voigt, Barbara
Tjahono, Gracia
Becker, Janine
Klapp, Burghard F.
Rauchfuss, Martina
Publication Title: 
CNS drugs

Nearly two-thirds of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) use vitamins or nutritional supplements, and many more may use other complementary therapies, yet <50% of patients have discussed the use of these complementary therapies with a healthcare professional. Physicians should be aware of the complementary therapies their patients with PD are using, and the possible effects of these therapies on motor and non-motor symptoms.

Author(s): 
Zesiewicz, Theresa A.
Evatt, Marian L.
Publication Title: 
Heart & Lung: The Journal of Critical Care

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether massage therapy improves postoperative mood, pain, anxiety, and physiologic measurements; shortens hospital stay; and decreases occurrence of atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Two hundred fifty-two adults undergoing cardiac surgery were randomized to usual postoperative care (n=126) or usual care plus two massages (n=126). Assessments of mood, depression, anxiety, pain, physiologic status, cardiac rhythm, and hospital length of stay were completed. Logistic and linear regressions were performed.

Author(s): 
Albert, Nancy M.
Gillinov, A. Marc
Lytle, Bruce W.
Feng, Jingyuan
Cwynar, Roberta
Blackstone, Eugene H.
Publication Title: 
CNS drugs

Nearly two-thirds of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) use vitamins or nutritional supplements, and many more may use other complementary therapies, yet <50% of patients have discussed the use of these complementary therapies with a healthcare professional. Physicians should be aware of the complementary therapies their patients with PD are using, and the possible effects of these therapies on motor and non-motor symptoms.

Author(s): 
Zesiewicz, Theresa A.
Evatt, Marian L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine

The effects of three different procedures, relaxation, visualization and yogic breathing and stretch (pranayama) on perceptions of physical and mental energy and on positive and negative mood states have been assessed in a group of normal volunteers (N = 71, age range 21-76). Pranayama produced a significantly greater increase in perceptions of mental and physical energy and feelings of alertness and enthusiasm than the other two procedures (P < 0.5). Relaxation made subjects significantly more sleepy and sluggish immediately after the session than pranayama (P < 0.05).

Author(s): 
Wood, C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To assess individual difference characteristics of subgroups of patients with fibromyalgia (FM) patients with respect to the decision to stay in or switch from randomly-assigned verum or placebo treatment during an optional crossover phase of a double-blinded homeopathy study. DESIGN: Double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, optional crossover clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-three (53) community-recruited patients with FM entered the optional crossover phase. INTERVENTION: Two homeopaths jointly selected an individualized homeopathic remedy for all patients.

Author(s): 
Bell, Iris R.
Lewis, Daniel A.
Brooks, Audrey J.
Schwartz, Gary E.
Lewis, Sabrina E.
Caspi, Opher
Cunningham, Victoria
Baldwin, Carol M.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Rehabilitation

OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of a brief Tai Chi Chuan Qigong ('Qigong') exercise intervention on individuals with traumatic brain injury. DESIGN: A single-centre randomized controlled trial pilot study. SETTING: A registered charity day centre in the community. SUBJECTS: Twenty individuals with traumatic brain injury. INTERVENTION: Intervention participants attended a Qigong exercise session for one hour per week over eight weeks. Control participants engaged in non-exercise-based social and leisure activities for the same intervention period.

Author(s): 
Blake, H.
Batson, M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies

OBJECTIVE: This systematic review aimed to critically appraise published clinical trials designed to assess the effect of Tai Chi on psychosocial well-being. DATA SOURCES: Databases searched included MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, HEALT, PsycINFO, CISCOM, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials of the Cochrane Library, and dissertations and conference proceedings from inception to August 2008. REVIEW METHODS: Methodological quality was assessed using a modified Jadad scale. A total of 15 studies met the inclusion criteria (i.e.

Author(s): 
Wang, Wei Chun
Zhang, Anthony Lin
Rasmussen, Bodil
Lin, Li-Wei
Dunning, Trisha
Kang, Seung Wan
Park, Byung-Joo
Lo, Sing Kai
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of a 10-week Tai Chi (TC) program on neuropsychological, psychological, and physical health of female cancer survivors. DESIGN: Twenty-three women with a history of cancer participated in 60-min TC classes two times/week for 10-weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Before and after the intervention, participants completed neuropsychological tests (memory, executive functioning, language, and attention); 5 tests of balance; and self-report questionnaires of neuropsychological complaints, stress and mood, and fatigue.

Author(s): 
Reid-Arndt, Stephanie A.
Matsuda, Sandy
Cox, Cathy R.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Rehabilitation

OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of a brief Tai Chi Chuan Qigong ('Qigong') exercise intervention on individuals with traumatic brain injury. DESIGN: A single-centre randomized controlled trial pilot study. SETTING: A registered charity day centre in the community. SUBJECTS: Twenty individuals with traumatic brain injury. INTERVENTION: Intervention participants attended a Qigong exercise session for one hour per week over eight weeks. Control participants engaged in non-exercise-based social and leisure activities for the same intervention period.

Author(s): 
Blake, H.
Batson, M.

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