Mood Disorders

Publication Title: 
Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies

OBJECTIVE: This systematic review aimed to critically appraise published clinical trials designed to assess the effect of Tai Chi on psychosocial well-being. DATA SOURCES: Databases searched included MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, HEALT, PsycINFO, CISCOM, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials of the Cochrane Library, and dissertations and conference proceedings from inception to August 2008. REVIEW METHODS: Methodological quality was assessed using a modified Jadad scale. A total of 15 studies met the inclusion criteria (i.e.

Author(s): 
Wang, Wei Chun
Zhang, Anthony Lin
Rasmussen, Bodil
Lin, Li-Wei
Dunning, Trisha
Kang, Seung Wan
Park, Byung-Joo
Lo, Sing Kai
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of a 10-week Tai Chi (TC) program on neuropsychological, psychological, and physical health of female cancer survivors. DESIGN: Twenty-three women with a history of cancer participated in 60-min TC classes two times/week for 10-weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Before and after the intervention, participants completed neuropsychological tests (memory, executive functioning, language, and attention); 5 tests of balance; and self-report questionnaires of neuropsychological complaints, stress and mood, and fatigue.

Author(s): 
Reid-Arndt, Stephanie A.
Matsuda, Sandy
Cox, Cathy R.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Rehabilitation

OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of a brief Tai Chi Chuan Qigong ('Qigong') exercise intervention on individuals with traumatic brain injury. DESIGN: A single-centre randomized controlled trial pilot study. SETTING: A registered charity day centre in the community. SUBJECTS: Twenty individuals with traumatic brain injury. INTERVENTION: Intervention participants attended a Qigong exercise session for one hour per week over eight weeks. Control participants engaged in non-exercise-based social and leisure activities for the same intervention period.

Author(s): 
Blake, H.
Batson, M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies

Sara, the participant in this single case study, had to leave work due to burnout. She is now recovered and working, but still complains of disturbed moods and worries about getting burned out again. The aim of this study was to, by way of Qigong and mindfulness exercise, increase the participant's positive mood to a functional level and to increase exercise experiences by combining mindfulness and Qigong practice. The professional practice intervention was planned to last twelve weeks, combining mindfulness practice and three different Qigong exercise techniques.

Author(s): 
Jouper, John
Johansson, Mattias
Publication Title: 
Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies

Single sessions of Qigong have been associated with increased positive affect/emotional benefits. In the present study the aim was to refine the present understanding by using newly developed research methodologies. Therefore, affective reactions were studied in a group performing Qigong through pre-, during, and post-assessments using a modified version of the short Swedish Core Affect Scale complemented with open-ended questions. Affect was measured on a group and individual level.

Author(s): 
Johansson, Mattias
Hassmén, Peter
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

The long-term effects of energetic healing were examined in an experimental design employing a 3 x 3 factorial MANOVA on symptoms of psychological depression and self-perceived stress as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Hopelessness, and Perceived Stress scales. Forty-six participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: hands-on Reiki, distance Reiki, or distance Reiki placebo, and remained blind to treatment condition. Each participant received a 1 to 1.5 hour treatment each week for 6 weeks.

Author(s): 
Shore, Adina Goldman
Publication Title: 
Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine = Chung I Tsa Chih Ying Wen Pan / Sponsored by All-China Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine
Author(s): 
Hu, Jinsheng
Publication Title: 
Industrial Health

To investigate the effects of acupuncture on perceived pain, mood disturbances and medical expenses related to low back pain (LBP), an intervention study was performed among 72 employees of a steel company, 70 males and 2 females, aged 53.1+/-7.1 (mean+/-SD) yr, with LBP. They received acupuncture treatment once a week for 8 wk (from October to December 1998) by licensed acupuncturists, adopting a new hypothesis of the Meridian test. Perceived pain scale, and Profile of Mood States (POMS) were administered.

Author(s): 
Sawazaki, Kenta
Mukaino, Yoshito
Kinoshita, Fujihisa
Honda, Tatsuro
Mohara, Osamu
Sakuraba, Hinata
Togo, Toshihiro
Yokoyama, Kazuhito
Publication Title: 
The British Journal of General Practice: The Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners

BACKGROUND: Medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) are common and difficult to treat. AIM: To investigate the effectiveness of adding five-element acupuncture to usual care in 'frequent attenders' with MUPS. DESIGN AND SETTING: Randomised controlled trial in four London general practices. METHOD: Participants were 80 adults with MUPS, consulting GPs ≥8 times/year. The intervention was individualised five-element acupuncture, ≥12 sessions, immediately (acupuncture group) and after 26 weeks (control group).

Author(s): 
Paterson, Charlotte
Taylor, Rod S.
Griffiths, Peter
Britten, Nicky
Rugg, Sue
Bridges, Jackie
McCallum, Bruce
Kite, Gerad
CACTUS study team
Publication Title: 
The British Journal of General Practice: The Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners

BACKGROUND: People with medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) are helped by interventions that combine physical and psychological explanations and treatment. Traditional acupuncture may offer such a perspective, but its use for these patients has not been investigated. AIM: To ascertain how patients with MUPS perceive and experience five-element acupuncture treatment. DESIGN AND SETTING: A longitudinal qualitative interview study, nested in a randomised controlled trial was carried out in four general practices in socioeconomically diverse areas of London.

Author(s): 
Rugg, Sue
Paterson, Charlotte
Britten, Nicky
Bridges, Jackie
Griffiths, Peter

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Mood Disorders