Oncology Nursing

Publication Title: 
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing

Although yoga has been practiced in Eastern culture for thousands of years as part of life philosophy, classes in the United States only recently have been offered to people with cancer. The word yoga is derived from the Sanskrit root yuj, meaning to bind, join, and yoke. This reflection of the union of the body, mind, and spirit is what differentiates yoga from general exercise programs. Yoga classes in the United States generally consist of asanas (postures), which are designed to exercise every muscle, nerve, and gland in the body.

Author(s): 
DiStasio, Susan A.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing

BACKGROUND: Introducing patients with cancer to the practice of yoga can be beneficial for coping with the side effects of treatment and the psychological aspects of cancer that are often difficult and distressing for patients. Oncology nurses can learn to use simple yoga techniques for themselves and as interventions with their patients. OBJECTIVES: This article provides details about the development and implementation of a yoga class for patients with cancer and provides details about other ways nurses can integrate yoga into oncology nursing and cancer care.

Author(s): 
Sisk, Angela
Fonteyn, Marsha
Publication Title: 
Cancer Nursing

BACKGROUND: The emotion of disgust appears to promote psychological and behavioral avoidance, a dynamic that has significant implications in physical and psychological outcomes in colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients, caregivers, and health professionals alike are all potentially susceptible to responding with disgust and the associated avoidance. OBJECTIVE: This article aimed to review the early-stage literature related to disgust and CRC, consider the clinical implications, and suggest an appropriate research agenda.

Author(s): 
Reynolds, Lisa M.
Consedine, Nathan S.
Pizarro, David A.
Bissett, Ian P.
Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and discuss existing studies of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) among breast cancer survivors. DATA SOURCES: Articles published from 1987-2009 were retrieved using MEDLINE®, CINAHL®, Ovid, and Scopus. Key words, including mindfulness-based stress reduction and mindfulness meditation, were combined with breast cancer.

Author(s): 
Matchim, Yaowarat
Armer, Jane M.
Stewart, Bob R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing: Official Journal of the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses

Symptom management in pediatric oncology remains a problem. Despite remarkable pharmacologic and surgical advances, children continue to report symptoms as the most troublesome aspect of cancer treatment. However, there are additional therapies that are not considered standard symptom management, such as acupuncture and guided imagery. These nonpharmacologic adjunctive therapies are a potential source of assistance for children with unrelenting pain, nausea, or other unpleasant symptoms due to cancer treatment.

Author(s): 
Rheingans, Jennifer I.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Nursing

BACKGROUND: Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is an established treatment in managing liver primary neoplasms or liver metastases. Postembolization syndrome (PES) is a common adverse event defined as fever without associated sepsis, pain in the right upper quadrant, and nausea and/or vomiting. OBJECTIVE: This integrative review aims to identify effective management strategies for PES or one of its characterizing symptoms (fever, pain, and nausea and/or vomiting). METHODS: Searches of electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL were conducted.

Author(s): 
Blackburn, Helen
West, Sandra
Publication Title: 
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing

With more than 10 million patients with cancer in the United States, pain and symptom management is an important topic for oncology nurses. Complementary therapies, such as therapeutic touch, may offer nurses a nonpharmacologic method to ease patients' pain. Using 12 research studies, the authors examined the evidence concerning the effectiveness of this type of treatment in reducing pain and anxiety.

Author(s): 
Jackson, Emily
Kelley, Megan
McNeil, Patrick
Meyer, Eileen
Schlegel, Lauren
Eaton, Melody
Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

Phenomenological interviews with 23 nurses and more than 200 hours of participant observation on units of one cancer hospital were conducted to obtain a better understanding of how nurses caring for patients with cancer view their work. When asked to discuss a "critical incident" that captures the essence of oncology nursing for them, most nurses described acute physiologic emergencies. A few nurses described psychosocial needs and explained how they had helped or were unable to help patients and families deal with these needs.

Author(s): 
Cohen, M. Z.
Sarter, B.
Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To advance understanding of the social well-being domain, a dimension of quality of life, from the perspective of dying individuals. RESEARCH APPROACH: Qualitative, hermeneutic, and phenomenologic. SETTING: Private residences in a community setting. PARTICIPANTS: 8 terminally ill adult patients with cancer, aged 35-75, enrolled in hospice care. METHODOLOGIC APPROACH: In-depth, semistructured, tape-recorded, and transcribed interviews were analyzed using the Giorgi method. MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Social well-being and quality of life at the end of life.

Author(s): 
Prince-Paul, Maryjo
Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To determine what patients with cancer and primary family caregivers expect from nurses with regard to having their spiritual needs addressed. RESEARCH APPROACH: Descriptive, cross-sectional, qualitative study using Miles and Huberman s approach to data reduction. SETTING: Outpatient and inpatient settings in a county hospital and a comprehensive cancer center, both located in a large, southwestern, metropolitan area.

Author(s): 
Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston

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