Patient Acceptance of Health Care

Publication Title: 
Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing: Official Journal of the American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses

Complementary and alternative therapies have enjoyed increasingly widespread use in recent years. Because of this trend, we were eager to obtain a better grasp on the actual number of people in our hospital's pain clinic who have used these modalities. In an effort to explore the use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) by patients seen in an anesthesiology chronic pain clinic, we conducted a study using a questionnaire. This questionnaire contained two sections, one covering complementary/alternative modalities and the other dealing with herbals or nutraceuticals.

Author(s): 
Konvicka, James J.
Meyer, Tricia A.
McDavid, Andrew J.
Roberson, Charles R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nursing: Official Publication of The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society

Pregnancy presents many problems without working through additional problems in coping with an ostomy. Yet many women with an ostomy do get pregnant and do deliver healthy babies. Evidence-based nursing is of the utmost importance, as there is little published information on this topic. Because of the scarcity of pregnant subjects within the ostomy category, most studies, by necessity, select a purposive subject base. Therefore, other information sources regarding nursing management of the pregnant woman with an ostomy take on considerably more importance.

Author(s): 
Sredl, Darlene
Aukamp, Virginia
Publication Title: 
Journal of Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nursing: Official Publication of The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society

Pregnancy presents many problems without working through additional problems in coping with an ostomy. Yet many women with an ostomy do get pregnant and do deliver healthy babies. Evidence-based nursing is of the utmost importance, as there is little published information on this topic. Because of the scarcity of pregnant subjects within the ostomy category, most studies, by necessity, select a purposive subject base. Therefore, other information sources regarding nursing management of the pregnant woman with an ostomy take on considerably more importance.

Author(s): 
Sredl, Darlene
Aukamp, Virginia
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Nursing & Midwifery

Five focus groups (five female non-users; five male non-users; seven males, both users and non-users; seven female users; six male and female users) were conducted to get an idea of lay people's knowledge and attitudes to CAM. In each group, run by the same experienced moderator, various topics were systematically explored: knowledge of CAM treatments; attitudes towards CAM; personal experience of CAM; suggestions for bringing CAM into wider use.

Author(s): 
Furnham, Adrian
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

In attempts to improve their health and/or combat illness, approximately 4 in 10 Americans will use a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy this year. CAM therapies vary widely, with acupuncture, chiropractic, herbal medicine, and homeopathy among the more prominent modalities. CAM therapies are used in addition to and/or instead of the more conventional forms of medical care available in U.S. hospitals or licensed physicians' offices.

Author(s): 
Barrett, Bruce
Publication Title: 
Family Practice

BACKGROUND: Complementary medicine is increasingly popular with patients and with GPs, although it still remains mainly in the private sector. Few data are available from the private sector about patient-consulting patterns and outcome. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to describe detailed consulting patterns, help-seeking behaviour and outcome of care for patients attending a group of private complementary practitioners in a single general practice surgery.

Author(s): 
Paterson, C.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

AIM: This systematic review is aimed at estimating the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)-use by paediatric populations in the United Kingdom (UK). METHOD: AMED, CINAHL, COCHRANE, EMBASE and MEDLINE were searched for English language peer-reviewed surveys published between 01 January 2000 and September 2011. Additionally, relevant book chapters and our own departmental files were searched manually. RESULTS: Eleven surveys were included with a total of 17,631 paediatric patients. The majority were of poor methodological quality.

Author(s): 
Posadzki, Paul
Watson, Leala
Alotaibi, Amani
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of and reasons for the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in paediatric patients, and to determine the parental need for appropriate information from their paediatrician. DESIGN: Questionnaire. METHOD: A questionnaire was given to the parents of general paediatric patients of the St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein and the University Medical Centre Utrecht, the Netherlands, in the period June 2003-March 2004. Parents were asked about CAM use in the past 12 months, which CAM modalities were used and their reasons for using it.

Author(s): 
Vlieger, A. M.
van de Putte, E. M.
Hoeksma, H.
Publication Title: 
Archives of Family Medicine

BACKGROUND: The use of homeopathy is growing in the United States, but little is known about practice patterns of physicians using homeopathy and the patients who seek homeopathic care. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data for consecutive patient visits to 27 doctors of medicine and doctors of osteopathy using homeopathy in 1992 were collected and compared with the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey of 1990. RESULTS: Patients seen by the homeopathic physicians were younger, more affluent, and more likely to present with long-term complaints.

Author(s): 
Jacobs, J.
Chapman, E. H.
Crothers, D.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

OBJECTIVE: To systematically review surveys of 12-month prevalence of visits to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners for five therapies: acupuncture, homeopathy, osteopathy, chiropractic, and medical herbalism. METHODS: Studies were identified via database searches to 2011. Study quality was assessed using a six-item tool. RESULTS: Forty-one surveys across 12 countries were included. Twenty-five (61%) met four of six quality criteria.

Author(s): 
Cooper, Katy L.
Harris, Philip E.
Relton, Clare
Thomas, Kate J.

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