Patients

Publication Title: 
Journal of the South Carolina Medical Association (1975)

Patients in this study were most comfortable receiving primary care services from physicians trained in primary care specialties. There was, however, a racial difference in the comfort level of primary care being provided by non-physician providers with minority populations being more comfortable with non-physician providers. More research is needed to understand the role that non-physician providers play in the primary care delivery system in the United States.

Author(s): 
Steyer, Terrence E.
Johnson, Endia
Mainous, Arch G.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to measure the selection effects of the inclusion of a chiropractic benefit on a managed care health plan. DESIGN: An analysis of enrollment data from a managed care health plan over a 4-year period was conducted. Employers could select the managed care plan with or without a chiropractic care benefit. Comparisons of demographic and comorbid characteristics were made between employees who had the chiropractic benefit and those who did not, and between individuals who self-selected chiropractic care and those who self-selected medical care.

Author(s): 
Nelson, Craig F.
Metz, R. Douglas
LaBrot, Thomas M.
Pelletier, Kenneth R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to provide an expanded description of Danish chiropractic patients and to compare characteristics seen in a survey from 1999 with those seen in 2002. METHODS: All chiropractic clinics in Denmark were asked to collect information on new patients during 1 randomly assigned week in 2002 using a survey questionnaire. All 52 weeks of the year 2002 were represented with an even dispersion of weeks (182 clinics participated).

Author(s): 
Sorensen, Line Press
Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen
Hartvigsen, Jan
Nilsson, Niels Grunnet
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article was to present a preliminary model to identify the effects of expectancy of treatment success and the patient-provider encounter (PPE) on outcomes in an open-label randomized trial. METHODS: Eighty participants with chronic cervicogenic headache (CGH) were randomized to 4 groups: 2 levels of treatment dose (8 or 16) and 2 levels of therapy from a chiropractor (spinal manipulation or light massage). Providers were instructed to have equal enthusiasm for all care.

Author(s): 
Haas, Mitchell
Aickin, Mikel
Vavrek, Darcy
Publication Title: 
Applied Ergonomics

The purpose of this study was to assess sleep quality and comfort of participants diagnosed with low back pain and stiffness following sleep on individually prescribed mattresses based on dominant sleeping positions. Subjects consisted of 27 patients (females, n=14; males, n=13; age 44.8 yrs ± SD 14.6, weight 174 lb. ± SD 39.6, height 68.3 in. ± SD 3.7) referred by chiropractic physicians for the study. For the baseline (pretest) data subjects recorded back and shoulder discomfort, sleep quality and comfort by visual analog scales (VAS) for 21 days while sleeping in their own beds.

Author(s): 
Jacobson, Bert H.
Boolani, Ali
Dunklee, Guy
Shepardson, Angela
Acharya, Hom
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: Ratings of usual pain over a period of 1 week are commonly used to rate a patient's usual level of pain intensity. This study investigated the validity of weekly recall pain ratings and biasing effects of pain levels on these ratings. METHODS: Seventy-eight patients presenting to a chiropractic outpatient clinic with nonspecific neck pain completed a 7-day diary rating their pain 4 times each day on an 11-point numerical rating scale. From these 28 ratings, the patients' "actual average" pain was computed.

Author(s): 
Bolton, Jennifer E.
Humphreys, B. Kim
van Hedel, Hubertus J. A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVES: The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of fall risk factors in older chiropractic patients. The secondary aim was to investigate the quality-of-life status of older chiropractic patients and to see whether a history of falling was related to quality-of-life status. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted at 12 chiropractic practices throughout Auckland, New Zealand, and Melbourne, Australia. The study involved gaining a profile of health status, fall history, and fall risk from active chiropractic patients who were 65 years or older.

Author(s): 
Holt, Kelly R.
Noone, Paul L.
Short, Krystal
Elley, C. Raina
Haavik, Heidi
Publication Title: 
Manual Therapy

Rare, serious, and common, benign adverse events (AE) are associated with MT techniques. A proposed standard for defining AE in manual therapy (MT) practise has been published but it did not include the patient perspective. Research comparing clinician and patient reporting of AE demonstrates that several differences exist; for example, the reporting of objective versus subjective events. The objective of this study was to describe how patients define AE associated with MT techniques. A descriptive qualitative design was employed.

Author(s): 
Carlesso, Lisa C.
Cairney, John
Dolovich, Lisa
Hoogenes, Jennifer
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Pain (London, England)

BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that health care professional (HCP) attitudes and beliefs may negatively influence the beliefs of patients with low back pain (LBP), but this has not been systematically reviewed. This review aimed to investigate the association between HCP attitudes and beliefs and the attitudes and beliefs, clinical management, and outcomes of this patient population. METHODS: Electronic databases were systematically searched for all types of studies. Studies were selected by predefined inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Darlow, B.
Fullen, B. M.
Dean, S.
Hurley, D. A.
Baxter, G. D.
Dowell, A.
Publication Title: 
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne

Unconventional therapies (UTs) are therapies not usually provided by Canadian physicians or other conventionally trained health care providers. Examples of common UTs available in Canada are herbal preparations, reflexology, acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine. UTs may be used along with conventional therapies (complementary) or instead of conventional therapies (alternative). Surveys have shown that many Canadians use UTs, usually as complementary therapies, for a wide range of diseases and conditions. Reliable information about UTs is often difficult to find.

Author(s): 
Kaegi, E.

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