Physicians

Publication Title: 
The Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine, New York

Principles of medical professionalism include humanistic values, altruism, ethical and moral behavior, and a lifelong commitment to scholarship and learning. These principles can provide behavioral guidelines to residents, fellows and their teacher-physicians during the formative years of postgraduate training. This short paper presents some of the challenging professional questions raised during these years of training, where medical professionalism may help to guide us.

Author(s): 
Nierman, David M.
Publication Title: 
Tropical Doctor

Altruism on the part of doctors and other health workers may help make health services affordable for the poor, but the altruistic contribution of doctors who are nationals of developing countries has largely been ignored. This paper describes the results of two related surveys carried out between February and April 2001 to determine the characteristics of indigenous charitable clinics in Patan, Nepal, and the attitudes of the Nepali health professionals who work in them. In 2001, 33 Nepali health professionals were working without payment in 13 charitable clinics in Patan.

Author(s): 
Allaby, Martin A. K.
Publication Title: 
World Hospitals and Health Services: The Official Journal of the International Hospital Federation

Medical education stands at the doorstep of profound change, forced to step into an uncertain and potentially hostile new environment. These changes have nothing to do with scholar self-reflection, but rather are a direct consequence of the process of globalization visible also in medical education and the revolution in health care financing for which we use the general term "managed care". On one hand, globalization has penetrated different areas of our life, among others including science, public health and medicine which is a global profession.

Author(s): 
Wojtczak, Andrzej
Publication Title: 
Bioethics

The seriousness of the risk that healthcare workers faced during SARS, and their response of service in the face of this risk, brings to light unrealistic assumptions about duty and risk that informed the debate on duty to care in the early years of HIV/AIDS. Duty to care is not based upon particular virtues of the health professions, but arises from social reflection on what response to an epidemic would be consistent with our values and our needs, recognizing our shared vulnerability to disease and death.

Author(s): 
Reid, Lynette
Publication Title: 
Australasian Psychiatry: Bulletin of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists

OBJECTIVES: This pilot study investigates the psychological impact on doctors of a complaint to the New South Wales Health Care Complaints Commission and the doctor's perception of legal risk. METHOD: Doctors who received a complaint were sent a set of questionnaires embracing psychological variables and their perceptions of legal risk. RESULTS: The response rate was 60%. Thirty-eight per cent of respondents met screening criteria for psychiatric disorder. There was, however, minimal functional impairment of work, social or family life.

Author(s): 
Nash, Louise
Curtis, Bradley
Walton, Merrilyn
Willcock, Simon
Tennant, Christopher
Publication Title: 
Journal of General Internal Medicine

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Academic health care institutions have become interested in understanding and supporting current leaders and preparing leaders for the future. We designed this exploratory study to better understand specific perceived leadership needs of physicians from the perspective of "aspiring" and "established" leaders within our institution. DESIGN: A qualitative, inductive, structured interview-based design was used to examine the study questions.

Author(s): 
Taylor, Christine A.
Taylor, Jay C.
Stoller, James K.
Publication Title: 
Medical Anthropology Quarterly

When medical practitioners act as expert witnesses for the plaintiff in contested illness lawsuits, they can be stigmatized by their professional community. Drawing on ethnographic research surrounding the condition multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS) in Australia, this article focuses on: how plaintiff experts specialize; their rationale for deviance from the professional norm; and structural constraints to medical advocacy.

Author(s): 
Phillips, Tarryn
Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Australia

OBJECTIVE: To use data from an evaluation of the Flinders University Parallel Rural Community Curriculum (PRCC) to inform four immediate challenges facing medical education in Australia as medical student numbers increase.

Author(s): 
Couper, Ian D.
Worley, Paul S.
Publication Title: 
The American Surgeon

The objective was to examine the economic, ethical, and legal foundations for conflict of interest restrictions between physicians and pharmaceutical and medical device industries ("industry"). Recently academic medical centers and professional organizations have adopted policies that restrict permissible interactions between industry and physicians. The motive is to avoid financial conflicts of interest that compromise core values of altruism and fiduciary relationships.

Author(s): 
Nakayama, Don K.
Publication Title: 
Perspectives in Biology and Medicine

The Flexner Report had its roots in the recognition in the mid-19th century that medical knowledge is not something fixed but something that grows and evolves. This new view of medical knowledge led to a recasting of the goal of medical education as that of instilling the proper techniques of acquiring and evaluating information rather than merely inculcating facts through rote memorization.

Author(s): 
Ludmerer, Kenneth M.

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