physiotherapy

Publication Title: 
Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica

OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of physiotherapeutic interventions on pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data sources: MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PEDro, CINAHL, AMED, and SCOPUS databases were searched up to December 2014 for studies written in English, French, German or Scandinavian languages that evaluated physiotherapeutic modalities for preventing and treating pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain. RESULTS: For lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy, the evidence was strong for positive effects of acupuncture and pelvic belts.

Author(s): 
Gutke, Annelie
Betten, Carola
Degerskär, Kristina
Pousette, Sara
Olsen, Monika Fagevik
Publication Title: 
Frontiers in Medicine

The treatment of voice disorders includes physiotherapy and complementary therapies. However, research to support these treatments is scarce. OBJECTIVE: to verify the effectiveness of physiotherapy and complementary therapies on voice disorders. Research on electronic databases PubMed/Medline, SciELO, and LILACS was performed using the combination: voice AND (treatment OR intervention) according to PRISMA guidelines. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the review.

Author(s): 
Cardoso, Ricardo
Meneses, Rute F.
Lumini-Oliveira, Jose
Publication Title: 
British Medical Bulletin

Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) of the lower limb affects millions of people worldwide, and results in pain and reduced function. We reviewed guidelines and Cochrane reviews for physical therapy interventions to manage the condition. Sources of data: Evidence from meta-analyses and systematic reviews was included. We also identified the recommendations from guidelines relevant to practice in the UK. Areas of agreement: There is strongest evidence to support the use of exercise to improve pain, function and quality of life.

Author(s): 
Walsh, Nicola E.
Pearson, Jennifer
Healey, Emma L.
Publication Title: 
Physiotherapy Theory and Practice

BACKGROUND: Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability in older adults (?60) in the UK. If nonsurgical management fails and if OA severity becomes too great, knee arthroplasty is a preferred treatment choice. Preoperative physiotherapy is often offered as part of rehabilitation to improve postoperative patient-based outcomes. OBJECTIVES: Systematically review whether preoperative physiotherapy improves postoperative, patient-based outcomes in older adults who have undergone total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and compare study interventions to best-practice guidelines.

Author(s): 
Chesham, Ross Alexander
Shanmugam, Sivaramkumar
Publication Title: 
Acupuncture in Medicine: Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether the combination of acupuncture and rehabilitation produces better results in the treatment of acute or subacute stroke sequelae than rehabilitation alone. METHODS: A systematic review was carried out. A search was conducted in March 2014 using PubMed, Medline, the Cochrane Library, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database (CNKI) and Wanfang databases. English and Chinese language articles published within 10 years of the search were reviewed for inclusion.

Author(s): 
Vados, Larissa
Ferreira, Alberto
Zhao, ShouFa
Vercelino, Rafael
Wang, Shu
Publication Title: 
Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica

OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of physiotherapeutic interventions on pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data sources: MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PEDro, CINAHL, AMED, and SCOPUS databases were searched up to December 2014 for studies written in English, French, German or Scandinavian languages that evaluated physiotherapeutic modalities for preventing and treating pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain. RESULTS: For lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy, the evidence was strong for positive effects of acupuncture and pelvic belts.

Author(s): 
Gutke, Annelie
Betten, Carola
Degerskär, Kristina
Pousette, Sara
Olsen, Monika Fagevik
Publication Title: 
Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine: Peer-Reviewed, Official Publication of Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine

Yakson is a Korean therapeutic touch given to neonates and infants by caressing their abdomen with one hand while the other hand is placed on the back of the neonate\infant either to relieve their pain or to calm them down. It was traditionally used by Koreans by caressing the aching body part of their children with a belief that it would relieve their pain. In spite of clinical evidence of its usefulness, there is limited literature available on Yakson touch.

Author(s): 
Parashar, Preeti
Samuel, Asir John
Bansal, Arpna
Aranka, Vencita Priyanka
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