Plant Growth Regulators

Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

BACKGROUND: The last comprehensive review of experimental research on effects of homeopathic treatments on plants was published in 1984, and lacked formal predefined criteria to assess study quality. Since then several new studies with more advanced methods have been published. OBJECTIVES: To compile a review of the literature on basic research in homeopathy with healthy plants with particular reference to studies investigating specific effects of homeopathic remedies.

Author(s): 
Majewsky, Vera
Arlt, Sebastian
Shah, Devika
Scherr, Claudia
Jäger, Tim
Betti, Lucietta
Trebbi, Grazia
Bonamin, Leoni
Klocke, Peter
Baumgartner, Stephan
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

OBJECTIVES: The objective was to evaluate homeopathic basic research studies that use plant-based bioassays. With this in view, a compilation was made of the findings of three systematic literature reviews covering plant-based bioassays in the three fields of healthy, abiotically, or biotically stressed plants. This compilation focused on investigations using advanced experimental methods and detailed descriptions, also with the aim of supporting the design of future experiments.

Author(s): 
Jäger, Tim
Scherr, Claudia
Shah, Devika
Majewsky, Vera
Wolf, Ursula
Betti, Lucietta
Baumgartner, Stephan
Publication Title: 
Plant Cell Reports

KEY MESSAGE : Rooting of Artemisia annua increases trichome size on leaves and helps drive the final steps of the biosynthesis of the sesquiterpene antimalarial drug, artemisinin. Artemisia annua produces the antimalarial drug, artemisinin (AN), which is synthesized and stored in glandular trichomes (GLTs). In vitro-grown A. annua shoots produce more AN when they form roots.

Author(s): 
Nguyen, Khanhvan T.
Towler, Melissa J.
Weathers, Pamela J.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays an important role in plant development and environmental stress response. In this study, we cloned an ABA receptor orthologue, AaPYL9, from Artemisia annua L. AaPYL9 is expressed highly in leaf and flower. AaPYL9 protein can be localized in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Yeast two-hybrid assay shows AaPYL9 can specifically interact with AtABI1 but not with AtABI2, AtHAB1 or AtHAB2. ABA can enhance the interaction between AaPYL9 and AtABI1 while AaPYL9-89 Pro?Ser and AaPYL9-116 His?Ala point mutations abolishes the interaction.

Author(s): 
Zhang, Fangyuan
Lu, Xu
Lv, Zongyou
Zhang, Ling
Zhu, Mengmeng
Jiang, Weiming
Wang, Guofeng
Sun, Xiaofen
Tang, Kexuan
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Biological Chemistry

Abscisic acid (ABA) has shown efficacy in the treatment of diabetes and inflammation; however, its molecular targets and the mechanisms of action underlying its immunomodulatory effects remain unclear. This study investigates the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR γ) and lanthionine synthetase C-like 2 (LANCL2) as molecular targets for ABA. We demonstrate that ABA increases PPAR γ reporter activity in RAW 264.7 macrophages and increases ppar γ expression in vivo, although it does not bind to the ligand-binding domain of PPAR γ.

Author(s): 
Bassaganya-Riera, Josep
Guri, Amir J.
Lu, Pinyi
Climent, Montse
Carbo, Adria
Sobral, Bruno W.
Horne, William T.
Lewis, Stephanie N.
Bevan, David R.
Hontecillas, Raquel
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

BACKGROUND: The last comprehensive review of experimental research on effects of homeopathic treatments on plants was published in 1984, and lacked formal predefined criteria to assess study quality. Since then several new studies with more advanced methods have been published. OBJECTIVES: To compile a review of the literature on basic research in homeopathy with healthy plants with particular reference to studies investigating specific effects of homeopathic remedies.

Author(s): 
Majewsky, Vera
Arlt, Sebastian
Shah, Devika
Scherr, Claudia
Jäger, Tim
Betti, Lucietta
Trebbi, Grazia
Bonamin, Leoni
Klocke, Peter
Baumgartner, Stephan
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVE: Use of a wheat growth bio assay after 7 days in research on homeopathic dilutions of gibberellic acid. METHODS: Grains of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum, Capo variety) were observed under the influence of extremely diluted gibberellic acid (10(-30)) prepared by stepwise dilution and agitation according to a protocol derived from homeopathy (30×). Analogously prepared water was used for control. In a two centre study, 3 experiments with a total of 4880 grains were performed.

Author(s): 
Pfleger, Andrea
Hofäcker, Jürgen
Scherer-Pongratz, Waltraud
Lothaller, Harald
Reich, Christian
Endler, Peter Christian
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

BACKGROUND: Reproducibility of basic research investigations in homeopathy is challenging. This study investigated if formerly observed effects of homeopathically potentised gibberellic acid (GA3) on growth of duckweed (Lemna gibba L.) were reproducible. METHODS: Duckweed was grown in potencies (14x-30x) of GA3 and one time succussed and unsuccussed water controls. Outcome parameter area-related growth rate was determined by a computerised image analysis system. Three series including five independent blinded and randomised potency experiments (PE) each were carried out.

Author(s): 
Majewsky, Vera
Scherr, Claudia
Arlt, Sebastian Patrick
Kiener, Jonas
Frrokaj, Kristina
Schindler, Tobias
Klocke, Peter
Baumgartner, Stephan
Publication Title: 
Ying Yong Sheng Tai Xue Bao = The Journal of Applied Ecology / Zhongguo Sheng Tai Xue Xue Hui, Zhongguo Ke Xue Yuan Shenyang Ying Yong Sheng Tai Yan Jiu Suo Zhu Ban

The present study provided the evidence that exogenous NO and ABA regulated the stomatal movement in poplar leaves. It showed that different levels of SNP and ABA induced the stomatal closure in detached leaves. NO enhanced stomatal closure that induced by ABA. The effect of NO and ABA on stomatal closure was suppressed by c-PTIO, a specific NO scavenger. It was confirmed that NO involved in ABA-mediated stomatal movement. The activities of POD were dramatically inhibited, but those of SOD hardly decreased in different levels of SNP and ABA treatment.

Author(s): 
Wang, Miao
Li, Qiurong
Fu, Shilei
Ji, Lanzhu
Xiao, Dongmei
Dong, Baili
Subscribe to RSS - Plant Growth Regulators