Plants, Edible

Publication Title: 
International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition

To identify promising sources of antioxidants, some food and medicinal plants were studied for total phenolic contents and antioxidant activity. The leaves, bark and fruits of Terminalia arjuna, Terminalia bellerica, Terminalia chebula and Terminalia muelleri, the leaves and fruits of Phyllanthus emblica, and the seeds of Syzygium cumini were found to have high total phenolic contents (72.0-167.2 mg/g) and high antioxidant activity (69.6-90.6%).

Author(s): 
Bajpai, Monika
Pande, Anurag
Tewari, S. K.
Prakash, Dhan
Publication Title: 
Pakistan journal of biological sciences: PJBS

Ethnobotanical knowledge is one of the precious cultural heritage parts of an area that involves the interaction between plants and people and foremost among these are the management of plant diversity by indigenous communities and the traditional use of medicinal plants. An ethnobotanical analysis was conducted in order to document the traditional medicinal uses of plants, particularly medicinally important folklore food phytonims of flora of Samahni valley, Azad Kashmir (Pakistan).

Author(s): 
Ishtiaq, Muhammad
Hanif, Wajahat
Khan, M. A.
Ashraf, M.
Butt, Ansar M.
Publication Title: 
Voprosy Pitaniia
Author(s): 
Mustafaev, Kh I.
Publication Title: 
The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society

An ideal diet is one that promotes optimal health and longevity. Throughout history, human societies have developed varieties of dietary patterns based on available food plants and animals that successfully supported growth and reproduction. As economies changed from scarcity to abundance, principal diet-related diseases have shifted from nutrient deficiencies to chronic diseases related to dietary excesses. This shift has led to increasing scientific consensus that eating more plant foods but fewer animal foods would best promote health.

Author(s): 
Nestle, M.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Hip fracture incidence rates are predicted to increase dramatically in the first half of the 21st century, especially in Asia, Latin America, Africa, and the Middle East. These increased rates will result primarily from the effects of public health efforts to improve nutrition and infectious-disease control, both of which contribute to improved longevity of populations. An example of a rapid increase in hip fracture incidence rates has been reported in Hong Kong.

Author(s): 
Anderson, J. J.
Publication Title: 
Forum of Nutrition

Food use is changing very fast all over the world. This and other changes (e.g. reduced physical activity, increased longevity) result in novel health risks for the populations in European countries and beyond. Also, in recent decades the convenience food market has grown dramatically and offers novel opportunities for small and large industries alike. Simultaneously, there is a dramatic and irrevocable loss of the local knowledge which forms the basis of many cultural traditions (traditional food knowledge--TFK).

Author(s): 
Heinrich, Michael
Nebel, Sabine
Leonti, Marco
Rivera, Diego
ObÛn, ConcepciÛn
Publication Title: 
TheScientificWorldJournal

Diabetes becomes a real problem of public health in developing countries, where its prevalence is increasing steadily. Diabetes mellitus can be found in almost every population in the world. Since the Ayurvedic practice started in India, plants are being used in the cure of diseases. Although the Catharanthus roseus have been used for their alleged health benefits and avail their hypoglycemic effect, used as medicine by diabetics. Medicinal plants have rarely been incorporated in food preparations.

Author(s): 
Bisla, Gita
Choudhary, Shailza
Chaudhary, Vijeta
Publication Title: 
TheScientificWorldJournal

Diabetes becomes a real problem of public health in developing countries, where its prevalence is increasing steadily. Diabetes mellitus can be found in almost every population in the world. Since the Ayurvedic practice started in India, plants are being used in the cure of diseases. Although the Catharanthus roseus have been used for their alleged health benefits and avail their hypoglycemic effect, used as medicine by diabetics. Medicinal plants have rarely been incorporated in food preparations.

Author(s): 
Bisla, Gita
Choudhary, Shailza
Chaudhary, Vijeta
Publication Title: 
PloS One

The erosion of cultural knowledge and traditions as a result of globalization and migration is a commonly reported phenomenon. We compared one type of cultural knowledge about medicinal plants (number of plants reported to treat thirty common health conditions) among Dominican laypersons who self-medicate with plants and live in rural or urban areas of the Dominican Republic (DR), and those who have moved to New York City (NYC). Many plants used as medicines were popular Dominican food plants.

Author(s): 
Vandebroek, Ina
Balick, Michael J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

Bioactive components in food plants can undergo dynamic processes that involve multiple chemical species. For example, 2'-hydroxychalcones can readily isomerize into flavanones. Although chemically well documented, this reaction has barely been explored in the context of cell-based assays.

Author(s): 
Simmler, Charlotte
Hajirahimkhan, Atieh
Lankin, David C.
Bolton, Judy L.
Jones, Tristesse
Soejarto, Djaja D.
Chen, Shao-Nong
Pauli, Guido F.

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