Promoter Regions, Genetic

Publication Title: 
Plant Physiology

Root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne species are major polyphagous pests of most crops worldwide, and cultivars with durable resistance are urgently needed because of nematicide bans. The Ma gene from the Myrobalan plum (Prunus cerasifera) confers complete-spectrum, heat-stable, and high-level resistance to RKN, which is remarkable in comparison with the Mi-1 gene from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), the sole RKN resistance gene cloned. We report here the positional cloning and the functional validation of the Ma locus present at the heterozygous state in the P.2175 accession.

Author(s): 
Claverie, Michel
Dirlewanger, Elisabeth
Bosselut, Nathalie
Van Ghelder, Cyril
Voisin, Roger
Kleinhentz, Marc
Lafargue, Bernard
Abad, Pierre
Rosso, Marie-Noëlle
Chalhoub, Boulos
Esmenjaud, Daniel
Publication Title: 
The EMBO journal

Telomere loss has been proposed as a mechanism for counting cell divisions during aging in normal somatic cells. How such a mitotic clock initiates the intracellular signalling events that culminate in G1 cell cycle arrest and senescence to restrict the lifespan of normal human cells is not known. We investigated the possibility that critically short telomere length activates a DNA damage response pathway involving p53 and p21(WAF1) in aging cells.

Author(s): 
Vaziri, H.
West, M. D.
Allsopp, R. C.
Davison, T. S.
Wu, Y. S.
Arrowsmith, C. H.
Poirier, G. G.
Benchimol, S.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Research

The vast majority of breast cancers are carcinomas that arise from mammary epithelial cells (MECs). One of the key early events in tumorigenic transformation is the ability of cells to overcome replicative senescence. However, the precise genetic changes that are responsible for this event in MECs is largely unknown. Here, we report that Bmi-1, originally identified as a c-Myc cooperating oncoprotein, can bypass senescence, extend the replicative life span, and immortalize MECs. Furthermore, Bmi-1 was overexpressed in immortal MECs and several breast cancer cell lines.

Author(s): 
Dimri, Goberdhan P.
Martinez, Jose-Luis
Jacobs, Jacqueline J. L.
Keblusek, Petra
Itahana, Koji
Van Lohuizen, Maarten
Campisi, Judith
Wazer, David E.
Band, Vimla
Publication Title: 
Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology

The ID (inhibitor of differentiation or DNA binding) helix-loop-helix proteins are important mediators of cellular differentiation and proliferation in a variety of cell types through regulation of gene expression. Overexpression of the ID proteins in normal human keratinocytes results in extension of culture lifespan, indicating that these proteins are important for epidermal differentiation. Our hypothesis is that the ID proteins are targets of the retinoic acid signaling pathway in keratinocytes.

Author(s): 
Villano, C. M.
White, L. A.
Publication Title: 
Oncogene

Human keratinocytes grown in co-culture with fibroblast feeder cells have an extended in vitro lifespan and delayed accumulation of the tumor suppressor protein p16(INK4a) when compared to the same cells grown on tissue culture plastic alone. Previous studies have indicated that human keratinocytes can be immortalized by telomerase activity alone when grown in co-culture with feeder cells, suggesting that loss of the p16(INK4a)/Rb pathway is not required for immortalization.

Author(s): 
Darbro, B. W.
Lee, K. M.
Nguyen, N. K.
Domann, F. E.
Klingelhutz, A. J.
Publication Title: 
Molecular Carcinogenesis

The Id family of helix-loop-helix transcription factors is upregulated in a variety of human malignancies and has been implicated in promoting tumorigenesis through effects on cell growth, differentiation, and tumor angiogenesis. While expression of Id proteins has been associated with tumorigenesis, the precise mechanistic relationship between Id expression and carcinogenesis has not been clearly delineated. We have previously shown that Id1 delays cellular senescence in primary mammalian cells through inhibition of the cell cycle regulatory protein and familial melanoma gene, p16/INK4a.

Author(s): 
Cummings, Staci D.
Ryu, Byungwoo
Samuels, Michael A.
Yu, Xiaobing
Meeker, Alan K.
Healey, Megan A.
Alani, Rhoda M.
Publication Title: 
FASEB journal: official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Cancer cells metabolize glucose at elevated rates and have a higher sensitivity to glucose reduction. However, the precise molecular mechanisms leading to different responses to glucose restriction between normal and cancer cells are not fully understood. We analyzed normal WI-38 and immortalized WI-38/S fetal lung fibroblasts and found that glucose restriction resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in WI-38/S cells, whereas it induced lifespan extension in WI-38 cells.

Author(s): 
Li, Yuanyuan
Liu, Liang
Tollefsbol, Trygve O.
Publication Title: 
Molecular genetics and genomics: MGG

The heat shock factor (HSF), a protein evolutionarily conserved from yeasts to human, regulates the expression of a set of proteins called heat shock proteins (HSPs), many of which function as molecular chaperones. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the HSF binds to the 5' upstream region of YGR146C and activates its transcription. YGR146C encodes a functional homolog of ecl1 (+), ecl2 (+), and ecl3 (+) of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. At present, these Ecl1 family genes, which are extenders of chronological lifespan, have been identified only in fungi groups.

Author(s): 
Ohtsuka, Hokuto
Azuma, Kenko
Murakami, Hiroshi
Aiba, Hirofumi
Publication Title: 
Experimental Cell Research

Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are characterized by co-participation of several epigenetic and genetic events during tumorigenesis. Having bypassed cellular senescence barriers during oncogenic transformation, the factors further affecting growth rate of STS cells remain poorly understood.

Author(s): 
Becerikli, Mustafa
Jacobsen, Frank
Rittig, Andrea
Kˆhne, Wiebke
Nambiar, Sandeep
Mirmohammadsadegh, Alireza
Stricker, Ingo
Tannapfel, Andrea
Wieczorek, Stefan
Epplen, Joerg Thomas
Tilkorn, Daniel
Steinstraesser, Lars
Publication Title: 
Genes & Development

The Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltransferase (SAGA) chromatin-modifying complex possesses acetyltransferase and deubiquitinase activities. Within this modular complex, Ataxin-7 anchors the deubiquitinase activity to the larger complex. Here we identified and characterized Drosophila Ataxin-7 and found that reduction of Ataxin-7 protein results in loss of components from the SAGA complex.

Author(s): 
Mohan, Ryan D.
Dialynas, George
Weake, Vikki M.
Liu, Jianqi
Martin-Brown, Skylar
Florens, Laurence
Washburn, Michael P.
Workman, Jerry L.
Abmayr, Susan M.

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