Psychotic Disorders

Publication Title: 
Early Intervention in Psychiatry

AIMS: To review intervention variables and outcomes of studies designed to increase physical activity or exercise participation among people experiencing first-episode psychosis. METHODS: A systematic review of electronic databases was conducted from inception to November 2014. RESULTS: Eleven eligible studies describing 12 interventions were included (n?=?351; 14-35 years) incorporating health coaching (n?=?5), exercise prescriptions based on physiological parameters (e.g.

Author(s): 
Rosenbaum, Simon
Lederman, Oscar
Stubbs, Brendon
Vancampfort, Davy
Stanton, Robert
Ward, Philip B.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine whether non-verbal therapies are effective in treating depressive symptoms in psychotic disorders. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, Psychinfo, Picarta, Embase and ISI Web of Science, up to January 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing a non-verbal intervention to a control condition in patients with psychotic disorders, whilst measuring depressive symptoms as a primary or secondary outcome, were included.

Author(s): 
Steenhuis, Laura A.
Nauta, Maaike H.
Bocking, Claudi L. H.
Pijnenborg, Gerdina H. M.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Schizophrenia & Related Psychoses

Over half of psychiatric patients use some kind of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, with Mind-Body Medicine (MBM) being the most commonly used collective modality. To date however, to our knowledge, no overarching review exists examining MBM for psychotic disorders. Thus the purpose of this paper is to present the first review in this area. A MEDLINE search was conducted of articles written in English from 1946 up to January 15, 2011 using a range of MBM and psychotic disorder search terms.

Author(s): 
Helgason, Chanel
Sarris, Jerome
Publication Title: 
Psychological Medicine

As one would expect for a heterogeneous syndrome like schizophrenia, at the individual level the course of symptoms and disability vary widely. Mindful that the definition of recovery/remission varies widely between studies, a recent systematic review and meta-analysis reported that the proportion of those with schizophrenia who recover on both symptom and functional outcome is modest (approximately 14%).

Author(s): 
McGrath, J. J.
Miettunen, J.
Jääskeläinen, E.
Dark, F.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing

WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Psychosis and the more specific diagnosis of schizophrenia constitute a major psychiatric disorder which impacts heavily on the self-esteem, functioning and quality of life of those affected. A number of mindfulness therapies have been developed in recent years, showing promising results when used with people with the disorder. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This review of the literature included only randomized controlled trials (RCTs), rather than other typically less robust methods of research (e.g. case studies, noncontrolled studies).

Author(s): 
Aust, J.
Bradshaw, T.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Schizophrenia & Related Psychoses

Over half of psychiatric patients use some kind of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, with Mind-Body Medicine (MBM) being the most commonly used collective modality. To date however, to our knowledge, no overarching review exists examining MBM for psychotic disorders. Thus the purpose of this paper is to present the first review in this area. A MEDLINE search was conducted of articles written in English from 1946 up to January 15, 2011 using a range of MBM and psychotic disorder search terms.

Author(s): 
Helgason, Chanel
Sarris, Jerome
Publication Title: 
Schizophrenia Research

BACKGROUND: An increasing number of mindfulness interventions are being used with individuals with psychosis or schizophrenia, but no known meta-analysis has investigated their effectiveness. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of mindfulness interventions for psychosis or schizophrenia, we conducted an effect-size analysis of initial studies. DATA SOURCES: A systematic review of studies published in journals or in dissertations in PubMED, PsycINFO or MedLine from the first available date until July 25, 2013. REVIEW METHODS: A total of 13 studies (n=468) were included.

Author(s): 
Khoury, Bassam
Lecomte, Tania
Gaudiano, Brandon A.
Paquin, Karine
Publication Title: 
Clinical Schizophrenia & Related Psychoses

Over half of psychiatric patients use some kind of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, with Mind-Body Medicine (MBM) being the most commonly used collective modality. To date however, to our knowledge, no overarching review exists examining MBM for psychotic disorders. Thus the purpose of this paper is to present the first review in this area. A MEDLINE search was conducted of articles written in English from 1946 up to January 15, 2011 using a range of MBM and psychotic disorder search terms.

Author(s): 
Helgason, Chanel
Sarris, Jerome
Publication Title: 
Praxis Der Kinderpsychologie Und Kinderpsychiatrie

The model of ego development by Loevinger describes an epigenetic series of successive stages comprising increasingly complex styles of impulse control, interpersonal relationships, moral and cognitive reasoning. This model offers an opportunity to explore the structural premises young adults rely on solving their developmental tasks. Controls compared to patients show a significantly superior intrapsychic coping, awareness of social rules and knowledge of interpersonal relations.

Author(s): 
Kapfhammer, H. P.
Neumeier, R.
Scherer, J.
Publication Title: 
Schizophrenia Research

Annett, Yeo et al. and Klar have each proposed theories that relate the genetics of cerebral lateralization to predisposition to psychosis. These theories are considered in relation to the central paradox that psychosis is associated with a substantial biological disadvantage. Annett's heterozygote advantage hypothesis critically identified lateralization as a major determinant of ability, but it appears that what is inherited is degrees (as suggested by Yeo et al.) rather than (or as well as) direction of lateralization.

Author(s): 
Crow, T. J.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Psychotic Disorders