Radiculopathy

Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

Background: A 2007 American College of Physicians guideline addressed nonpharmacologic treatment options for low back pain. New evidence is now available. Purpose: To systematically review the current evidence on nonpharmacologic therapies for acute or chronic nonradicular or radicular low back pain. Data Sources: Ovid MEDLINE (January 2008 through February 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists.

Author(s): 
Chou, Roger
Deyo, Richard
Friedly, Janna
Skelly, Andrea
Hashimoto, Robin
Weimer, Melissa
Fu, Rochelle
Dana, Tracy
Kraegel, Paul
Griffin, Jessica
Grusing, Sara
Brodt, Erika D.
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration-deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries.

Author(s): 
Binder, Allan I.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Neck pain is common, disabling and costly. Exercise is one treatment approach. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of exercises to improve pain, disability, function, patient satisfaction, quality of life and global perceived effect in adults with neck pain. SEARCH METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, MANTIS, ClinicalTrials.gov and three other computerized databases up to between January and May 2014 plus additional sources (reference checking, citation searching, contact with authors).

Author(s): 
Gross, Anita
Kay, Theresa M.
Paquin, Jean-Philippe
Blanchette, Samuel
Lalonde, Patrick
Christie, Trevor
Dupont, Genevieve
Graham, Nadine
Burnie, Stephen J.
Gelley, Geoff
Goldsmith, Charles H.
Forget, Mario
Hoving, Jan L.
Brønfort, Gert
Santaguida, Pasqualina L.
Cervical Overview Group
Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

Background: A 2007 American College of Physicians guideline addressed nonpharmacologic treatment options for low back pain. New evidence is now available. Purpose: To systematically review the current evidence on nonpharmacologic therapies for acute or chronic nonradicular or radicular low back pain. Data Sources: Ovid MEDLINE (January 2008 through February 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists.

Author(s): 
Chou, Roger
Deyo, Richard
Friedly, Janna
Skelly, Andrea
Hashimoto, Robin
Weimer, Melissa
Fu, Rochelle
Dana, Tracy
Kraegel, Paul
Griffin, Jessica
Grusing, Sara
Brodt, Erika D.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Neck pain is common, disabling and costly. Exercise is one treatment approach. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of exercises to improve pain, disability, function, patient satisfaction, quality of life and global perceived effect in adults with neck pain. SEARCH METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, MANTIS, ClinicalTrials.gov and three other computerized databases up to between January and May 2014 plus additional sources (reference checking, citation searching, contact with authors).

Author(s): 
Gross, Anita
Kay, Theresa M.
Paquin, Jean-Philippe
Blanchette, Samuel
Lalonde, Patrick
Christie, Trevor
Dupont, Genevieve
Graham, Nadine
Burnie, Stephen J.
Gelley, Geoff
Goldsmith, Charles H.
Forget, Mario
Hoving, Jan L.
Brønfort, Gert
Santaguida, Pasqualina L.
Cervical Overview Group
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration-deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries.

Author(s): 
Binder, Allan I.
Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

Background: A 2007 American College of Physicians guideline addressed nonpharmacologic treatment options for low back pain. New evidence is now available. Purpose: To systematically review the current evidence on nonpharmacologic therapies for acute or chronic nonradicular or radicular low back pain. Data Sources: Ovid MEDLINE (January 2008 through February 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists.

Author(s): 
Chou, Roger
Deyo, Richard
Friedly, Janna
Skelly, Andrea
Hashimoto, Robin
Weimer, Melissa
Fu, Rochelle
Dana, Tracy
Kraegel, Paul
Griffin, Jessica
Grusing, Sara
Brodt, Erika D.
Publication Title: 
Radiology

PURPOSE: To retrospectively examine the association between the inclusion of epidemiologic information in lumbar spine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging reports regarding findings in asymptomatic individuals and the rates of subsequent cross-sectional imaging and treatments in patients with low back pain or radiculopathy referred for imaging by primary care providers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Institutional review board approval was received for a retrospective chart review, with waiver of informed consent and HIPAA authorization.

Author(s): 
McCullough, Brendan J.
Johnson, Germaine R.
Martin, Brook I.
Jarvik, Jeffrey G.
Publication Title: 
Voprosy Kurortologii, Fizioterapii, I Lechebnoĭ Fizicheskoĭ Kultury

A new non-linear spinal traction technology is described in which a low traction force is applied to a patient placed in a physiologically comfortable position in the combination with mechanical roll and vibratory massage producing analgesic and myorelaxing effects. This approach made it possible to extend the scope of indications for the use of spinal traction for the treatment of patients presenting with disfiguring dorsopathies.

Author(s): 
Miriutova, N. F.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: To present a case of cervical radiculopathy, caused by an MRI documented herniated cervical disc, which was treated with conservative care including chiropractic manipulative therapy. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 60-yr-old woman was treated by a chiropractor for symptoms including a deep, constant, burning ache in the left arm, and severe neck and left shoulder pain. A diagnosis of acute herniated cervical disc was made based on the findings of physical examination and an MRI study of the patient's cervical spine.

Author(s): 
Brouillette, D. L.
Gurske, D. T.

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