Religion and Medicine

Publication Title: 
Explore (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: Many Americans use religious activity to cope with stressful life events. Our goal was to review systematically the recent medical literature to assess the role of religion in health outcomes. DATA SOURCES: We conducted a comprehensive literature search using MEDLINE to identify studies published in the English language between January 1999 and June 2003 describing the effect of religion on health outcomes.

Author(s): 
Coruh, Ba?ak
Ayele, Hana
Pugh, Meredith
Mulligan, Thomas
Publication Title: 
The American Psychologist

The authors review evidence regarding the biological processes that may link religiosity/spirituality to health. A growing body of observational evidence supports the hypothesis that links religiosity/spirituality to physiological processes. Although much of the earliest evidence came from cross-sectional studies with questionable generalizability and potential confounding, more recent research, with more representative samples and multivariate analysis, provides stronger evidence linking Judeo-Christian religious practices to blood pressure and immune function.

Author(s): 
Seeman, Teresa E.
Dubin, Linda Fagan
Seeman, Melvin
Publication Title: 
Explore (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: Many Americans use religious activity to cope with stressful life events. Our goal was to review systematically the recent medical literature to assess the role of religion in health outcomes. DATA SOURCES: We conducted a comprehensive literature search using MEDLINE to identify studies published in the English language between January 1999 and June 2003 describing the effect of religion on health outcomes.

Author(s): 
Coruh, Ba?ak
Ayele, Hana
Pugh, Meredith
Mulligan, Thomas
Publication Title: 
The American Psychologist

The authors review evidence regarding the biological processes that may link religiosity/spirituality to health. A growing body of observational evidence supports the hypothesis that links religiosity/spirituality to physiological processes. Although much of the earliest evidence came from cross-sectional studies with questionable generalizability and potential confounding, more recent research, with more representative samples and multivariate analysis, provides stronger evidence linking Judeo-Christian religious practices to blood pressure and immune function.

Author(s): 
Seeman, Teresa E.
Dubin, Linda Fagan
Seeman, Melvin
Publication Title: 
Explore (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: Many Americans use religious activity to cope with stressful life events. Our goal was to review systematically the recent medical literature to assess the role of religion in health outcomes. DATA SOURCES: We conducted a comprehensive literature search using MEDLINE to identify studies published in the English language between January 1999 and June 2003 describing the effect of religion on health outcomes.

Author(s): 
Coruh, Ba?ak
Ayele, Hana
Pugh, Meredith
Mulligan, Thomas
Publication Title: 
Explore (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: Many Americans use religious activity to cope with stressful life events. Our goal was to review systematically the recent medical literature to assess the role of religion in health outcomes. DATA SOURCES: We conducted a comprehensive literature search using MEDLINE to identify studies published in the English language between January 1999 and June 2003 describing the effect of religion on health outcomes.

Author(s): 
Coruh, Ba?ak
Ayele, Hana
Pugh, Meredith
Mulligan, Thomas
Publication Title: 
Journal of Professional Nursing: Official Journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing

This article argues that in the current setting of nursing practice, therapeutic touch should be treated as a religious practice. The article examines the religious sources of the ideas and documents the connection with the teachings of particular religious groups. Recognizing therapeutic touch as a religious issue requires new kinds of approaches in the practice and teaching of therapeutic touch in nursing.

Author(s): 
Bullough, V. L.
Bullough, B.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

OBJECTIVES: To assess lifestyle factors including physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, and dietary habits in men and women with exceptional longevity. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: A cohort of community-dwelling Ashkenazi Jewish individuals with exceptional longevity defined as survival and living independently at age 95 and older.

Author(s): 
Rajpathak, Swapnil N.
Liu, Yingheng
Ben-David, Orit
Reddy, Saritha
Atzmon, Gil
Crandall, Jill
Barzilai, Nir
Publication Title: 
Journal of the Royal Society of Health

Morbidity and longevity among the middle-aged and elderly are affected by a variety of factors including genetics, social class, diet, smoking practice, alcohol consumption, and physical activity. Additionally, in some individuals and communities, the factors of attitude, regularity of life and religiosity appear important. In this contribution, some behavioural and metabolic ramifications of adverse attitude are discussed, and some examples are given of benefits conferred in populations, past and present, marked by regularity of life and religiosity.

Author(s): 
Walker, A. R.
Publication Title: 
The British Journal of Nutrition

The longevity and excellent health status of the population of Crete has been attributed to its lifestyle and dietary habits. The impact of Greek Orthodox Christian Church fasting on these dietary habits has never been studied. One hundred and twenty Greek Orthodox Christians living in Crete participated in a 1-year prospective study. One half of the subjects, who fasted regularly (fasters), and sixty non-faster controls were followed longitudinally for the three main fasting periods over 1 year; Christmas (40 d), Lent (48 d) and the Assumption (15 d).

Author(s): 
Sarri, Katerina O.
Linardakis, Manolis K.
Bervanaki, Frosso N.
Tzanakis, Nikolaos E.
Kafatos, Anthony G.

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