Research Design

Publication Title: 
Swiss Medical Weekly

OBJECTIVE: An increasing number of patients with asthma are attracted by complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Therefore, it is of importance that scientific evidence about the efficacy of this type of therapy is regarded. METHOD: We searched the electronic databases Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library for controlled trials and systematic reviews to evaluate the evidence of the most popular alternative therapies, i.e. acupuncture, homeopathy, breathing techniques, herbal and nutritional therapies.

Steurer-Stey, Claudia
Russi, Erich W.
Steurer, Johann
Publication Title: 
Journal of Neurology

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common disorder, for which various conservative treatment options are available. The objective of this study is to determine the efficacy of the various conservative treatment options for relieving the symptoms of CTS. Computer-aided searches of MEDLINE (1/1966 to 3/2000), EMBASE (1/1988 to 2/2000) and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (2000, issue 1) were conducted, together with reference checking.

Gerritsen, Annette A. M.
de Krom, Marc C. T. F. M.
Struijs, Margaretha A.
Scholten, Rob J. P. M.
de Vet, Henrica C. W.
Bouter, Lex M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: Meditative techniques are sought frequently by patients coping with medical and psychological problems. Because of their increasingly widespread appeal and use, and the potential for use as medical therapies, a concise and thorough review of the current state of scientific knowledge of these practices as medical interventions was conducted. PURPOSE: To systematically review the evidence supporting efficacy and safety of meditative practices in treating illnesses, and examine areas warranting further study. Studies on normal healthy populations are not included.

Arias, Albert J.
Steinberg, Karen
Banga, Alok
Trestman, Robert L.
Publication Title: 
Psychosomatic Medicine

Many nonpharmacologic (behavioral) techniques are being proposed for the therapy of essential hypertension. The research in this area is reviewed and divided roughly into two categories: the biofeedback and relaxation methodologies. While feedback can be used to lower pressures during laboratory training sessions, studies designed to alter basal blood pressure levels with biofeedback have not yet been reported. The absence of evidence for such changes through biofeedback limits the usefulness of this technique in hypertension control.

Frumkin, K.
Nathan, R. J.
Prout, M. F.
Cohen, M. C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To provide a descriptive overview of the clinical trials assessing meditation practices for health care. DESIGN: Systematic review of the literature. Comprehensive searches were conducted in 17 electronic bibliographic databases through September 2005. Other sources of potentially relevant studies included hand searches, reference tracking, contacting experts, and gray literature searches. Included studies were clinical trials with 10 or more adult participants using any meditation practice, providing quantitative data on health-related outcomes, and published in English.

Ospina, Maria B.
Bond, Kenneth
Karkhaneh, Mohammad
Buscemi, Nina
Dryden, Donna M.
Barnes, Vernon
Carlson, Linda E.
Dusek, Jeffery A.
Shannahoff-Khalsa, David
Publication Title: 
Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Breast and prostate cancers are the most commonly diagnosed non-dermatologic malignancies in Canada. Agents including endocrine therapies (e.g., aromatase inhibitors, gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogs, anti-androgens, tamoxifen) and chemotherapy have improved survival for both conditions. As endocrine manipulation is a mainstay of treatment, it is not surprising that hot flashes are a common and troublesome adverse effect. Hot flashes can cause chills, night sweats, anxiety, and insomnia, lessening patients' quality of life.

Hutton, Brian
Yazdi, Fatemeh
Bordeleau, Louise
Morgan, Scott
Cameron, Chris
Kanji, Salmaan
Fergusson, Dean
Tricco, Andrea
Straus, Sharon
Skidmore, Becky
Hersi, Mona
Pratt, Misty
Mazzarello, Sasha
Brouwers, Melissa
Moher, David
Clemons, Mark
Publication Title: 
Journal of Stem Cells

CONTEXT AND AIM: Complementary and alternative therapies (CAM) are gaining popularity amongst patients as add on to conventional medicine. Yoga stands third amongst all CAM that is being used by cancer patients today. Different schools of yoga use different sets of practices, with some using a more physical approach and many using meditation and/or breathing. All these modules are developed based on the needs of the patient.

Ram, Amritanshu
Raghuram, Nagarathna
Rao, Raghavendra M.
Bhargav, Hemant
Koka, Prasad S.
Tripathi, Satyam
Nelamangala, Raghuram V.
Kodaganur, Gopinath S.
Ramarao, Nagendra Hongasandra
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVES: Comparison groups are essential for accurate testing and interpretation of yoga intervention trials. However, selecting proper comparison groups is difficult because yoga comprises a very heterogeneous set of practices and its mechanisms of effect have not been conclusively established. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of the control and comparison groups used in published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of yoga.

Park, Crystal L.
Groessl, Erik
Maiya, Meghan
Sarkin, Andrew
Eisen, Susan V.
Riley, Kristen
Elwy, A. Rani
Publication Title: 
Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of children and adolescents, with a significant impact on health services and the community in terms of economic and social burdens. The objective of this systematic review will be to evaluate the comparative efficacy and safety of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments in children and adolescents with ADHD.

Catalá-López, Ferrán
Hutton, Brian
Núñez-Beltrán, Amparo
Mayhew, Alain D.
Page, Matthew J.
Ridao, Manuel
Tobías, Aurelio
Catalá, Miguel A.
Tabarés-Seisdedos, Rafael
Moher, David
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

A systematic review revealed three small randomised controlled trials of yoga for low back pain, all of which showed effects on back pain that favoured the yoga group. To build on these studies a larger trial, with longer term follow-up, and a number of different yoga teachers delivering the intervention is required. This study protocol describes the details of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Yoga for chronic Low Back Pain, which is funded by Arthritis Research Campaign (arc) and is being conducted by the University of York.

Cox, Helen
Tilbrook, Helen
Aplin, John
Chuang, Ling-Hsiang
Hewitt, Catherine
Jayakody, Shalmini
Semlyen, Anna
Soares, Marta O.
Torgerson, David
Trewhela, Alison
Watt, Ian
Worthy, Gill


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