Resilience, Psychological

Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

Healthcare providers may experience a high level of stress, fatigue, and anxiety originating from different factors. Mind-body therapies, which include many interventions, have been proposed to alleviate these conditions. These interventions have been reported to decrease the level of stress, and the negative outcomes associated with these factors: high burnout rate, and poor quality of care for patients.

Author(s): 
Mensah, Sylvanus Brenya
Anderson, Joel G.
Publication Title: 
Medical Teacher

INTRODUCTION: This literature review summarizes the current evidence on educational interventions to develop healthcare worker resilience. METHODS: Electronic databases were systematically searched using the search terms: education OR training OR medical students AND resilience. The initial search was refined using criteria including population (healthcare students and professionals), interventions (educational), and outcome (resilience changes). RESULTS: Resilience has been defined and measured in various ways.

Author(s): 
Rogers, David
Publication Title: 
Brain, Behavior, and Immunity

Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been associated with reduced leukocyte telomere length (LTL). It is not known, however, whether psychosocial and behavioral protective factors moderate this association. In the current study, we examine whether multisystem resiliency--defined by healthy emotion regulation, strong social connections, and health behaviors (sleep and exercise)--predicts LTL and mitigates previously demonstrated associations between depression diagnosis and LTL.

Author(s): 
Puterman, Eli
Epel, Elissa S.
Lin, Jue
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Gross, James J.
Whooley, Mary A.
Cohen, Beth E.
Publication Title: 
Psychoneuroendocrinology

Chronic psychological stress appears to accelerate biological aging, and oxidative damage is an important potential mediator of this process. However, the mechanisms by which psychological stress promotes oxidative damage are poorly understood. This study investigates the theory that cortisol increases in response to an acutely stressful event have the potential to either enhance or undermine psychobiological resilience to oxidative damage, depending on the body's prior exposure to chronic psychological stress.

Author(s): 
Aschbacher, Kirstin
O'Donovan, Aoife
Wolkowitz, Owen M.
Dhabhar, Firdaus S.
Su, Yali
Epel, Elissa
Publication Title: 
Brain, Behavior, and Immunity

Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been associated with reduced leukocyte telomere length (LTL). It is not known, however, whether psychosocial and behavioral protective factors moderate this association. In the current study, we examine whether multisystem resiliency--defined by healthy emotion regulation, strong social connections, and health behaviors (sleep and exercise)--predicts LTL and mitigates previously demonstrated associations between depression diagnosis and LTL.

Author(s): 
Puterman, Eli
Epel, Elissa S.
Lin, Jue
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Gross, James J.
Whooley, Mary A.
Cohen, Beth E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines

Experiences during early development profoundly affect development of the central nervous system (CNS) to impart either risk for or resilience to later psychopathology. Work in the developmental neuroscience field is providing compelling data that epigenetic marking of the genome may underlie aspects of this process. Experiments in rodents continue to show that experiences during sensitive periods of development influence DNA methylation patterns of several genes.

Author(s): 
Roth, Tania L.
Sweatt, J. David
Publication Title: 
Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews

The impact that stressful encounters have upon long-lasting behavioural phenotypes is varied. Whereas a significant proportion of the population will develop "stress-related" conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder or depression in later life, the majority are considered "resilient" and are able to cope with stress and avoid such psychopathologies. The reason for this heterogeneity is undoubtedly multi-factorial, involving a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors.

Author(s): 
Dudley, Kevin J.
Li, Xiang
Kobor, Michael S.
Kippin, Tod E.
Bredy, Timothy W.
Publication Title: 
Current Opinion in Psychiatry

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In a context of global concern about the consequences of stress and extreme adversities, advances in theory and methods for studying human resilience have ushered in a new era of integrative, biopsychosocial research. This review highlights recent theory, findings, and implications of resilience research on young people. RECENT FINDINGS: Resilience research has shifted toward dynamic system models with multiple levels of interaction, including research on the neurobiology of stress and adaption, epigenetic processes, and disasters.

Author(s): 
Sapienza, Julianna K.
Masten, Ann S.
Publication Title: 
The Psychiatric Clinics of North America

In summary, depressed patients with a history of childhood trauma may have a distinct depression endophenotype characterized by a specific neurobiology and risk genotype that may be responsive to different treatment strategies than depressed patients without childhood adversity. Based on current findings, treatment strategies should be multimodal and include the following: 1.

Author(s): 
Saveanu, Radu V.
Nemeroff, Charles B.
Publication Title: 
Medecine Sciences: M/S

The likelihood of adult psychiatric problems is increased by childhood trauma, particularly so in carriers of certain alleles of certain genes. I discuss here a recent paper that sheds light on the mechanism of this effect, showing that specific demethylation occurring at the time of the initial trauma persists at adulthood and induces an increased reactivity to stress.

Author(s): 
Jordan, Bertrand

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