Secularism

Publication Title: 
Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal

As the twentieth century closes, marked by triumphal strides in medical advances, the American society has yet to ensure that each person has access to affordable health care. To correct this injustice, this article calls on the nation's political and corporate leaders, providers, and faith-based groups to join all Americans in a new national conversation on systemic health care reform.

Author(s): 
Place, Michael D.
Publication Title: 
HEC forum: an interdisciplinary journal on hospitals' ethical and legal issues

Mayo Clinic is recognized as a worldwide leader in innovative, high-quality health care. However, the Catholic mission and ideals from which this organization was formed are not widely recognized or known. From partnership with the Sisters of St. Francis in 1883, through restructuring of the Sponsorship Agreement in 1986 and current advancements, this Catholic mission remains vital today at Saint Marys Hospital. This manuscript explores the evolution and growth of sponsorship at Mayo Clinic, defined as "a collaboration between the Sisters of St.

Author(s): 
Swetz, Keith M.
Crowley, Mary E.
Maines, T. Dean
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

Can proposing a policy of equal access to health care be justified on Christian grounds? The notion of a "Christian justification" with regard to Christians' political activity is explored in relation to the New Testament texts. The less demanding policy of granting "rights to (basic) health care," the meaning of Jesus' healing activities, early Christian welfare schemes, and Christian grounds for the ascription of "rights" are each discussed.

Author(s): 
Delkeskamp-Hayes, Corinna
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

Descriptively many Protestant perspectives on access to health care share much in common with secular accounts ... perhaps too much. A normative account of a Protestant perspective on access to health care must be perceptively qualified by the Christ story. A genuinely theocratic approach may not lead one to the conclusion that the faith commits us to the notion of equality; rather the faith commits us to the notion of care. What counts as care may not be the same in every instance (if this is indeed what equality means; in ordinary use, equality is tantamount to sameness).

Author(s): 
Stoneking, Carole Bailey
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

Being a Christian involves metaphysical, epistemological, and social commitments that set Christians at variance with the dominant secular culture. Because Christianity is not syncretical, but proclaims the unique truth of its revelations, Christians will inevitably be placed in some degree of conflict with secular health care institutions.

Author(s): 
Engelhardt, H. Tristram
Publication Title: 
Zygon

This essay argues that Japan's resistance to the practice of transplanting organs from persons deemed "brain dead" may not be the result, as some claim, of that society's religions being not yet sufficiently expressive of love and altruism. The violence to the body necessary for the excision of transplantable organs seems to have been made acceptable to American Christians at a unique historical "window of opportunity" for acceptance of that new form of medical technology.

Author(s): 
LaFleur, William R.
Publication Title: 
Third World Quarterly

This article explores the common ideological ground between Islam and Christianity in Nigeria, in the ways in which gender and sexuality are configured in relation to women's bodies. The latter constitute key sites for the inscription of social norms and practices inherent in particular interpretations of religion. We proceed by examining the interplay between religion and politics in historical context and in specific concrete instances.

Author(s): 
Pereira, Charmaine
Ibrahim, Jibrin
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Psychology

This study was designed to fill gaps in the new field of positive psychology. Using data from two sequential interviews, this study examined the effect of faith-based and secular pathways to hope and optimism among 226 middle-aged and older patients facing a major medical crisis-cardiac surgery. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that religious faith factors contributed to the agency component of hope and dispositional optimism indirectly through the use of prayer as a coping strategy.

Author(s): 
Ai, Amy L.
Peterson, Christopher
Tice, Terrence N.
Bolling, Steven F.
Koenig, Harold G.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Psychology

This study was designed to fill gaps in the new field of positive psychology. Using data from two sequential interviews, this study examined the effect of faith-based and secular pathways to hope and optimism among 226 middle-aged and older patients facing a major medical crisis-cardiac surgery. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that religious faith factors contributed to the agency component of hope and dispositional optimism indirectly through the use of prayer as a coping strategy.

Author(s): 
Ai, Amy L.
Peterson, Christopher
Tice, Terrence N.
Bolling, Steven F.
Koenig, Harold G.
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

At the beginning of the twenty-first century, with vocations to the Christian religious orders of the West in marked decline, an authentic Christian presence in health care is threatened. There are no longer large numbers of women willing to offer their life labors bound in vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience, so as to provide a real preferential option for the poor through supporting an authentic Christian mission in health care. At the same time, the frequent earlier death of men leaves a large number of widows, some in need of care and some able to provide care.

Author(s): 
Engelhardt, H. Tristram

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Secularism