Stress, Psychological

Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

Lifestyle modification is a cornerstone of hypertension (HPT) treatment, yet most recommendations currently focus on diet and exercise and do not consider stress reduction strategies. Yoga is a spiritual path that may reduce blood pressure (BP) through reducing stress, increasing parasympathetic activation, and altering baroreceptor sensitivity; however, despite reviews on yoga and cardiovascular disease, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and anxiety that suggest yoga may reduce BP, no comprehensive review has yet focused on yoga and HPT.

Author(s): 
Tyagi, Anupama
Cohen, Marc
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: A sedentary lifestyle and stress are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Since yoga involves exercise and is thought to help in stress reduction it may be an effective strategy in the primary prevention of CVD. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of any type of yoga on the primary prevention of CVD.

Author(s): 
Hartley, Louise
Dyakova, Mariana
Holmes, Jennifer
Clarke, Aileen
Lee, Myeong Soo
Ernst, Edzard
Rees, Karen
Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychiatric Research

Stress related disorders such as depression and anxiety are leading sources of disability worldwide, and current treatment methods such as conventional antidepressant medications are not beneficial for all individuals. There is evidence that yoga has mood-enhancing properties possibly related to its inhibitory effects on physiological stress and inflammation, which are frequently associated with affective disorders. However the biological mechanisms via which yoga exerts its therapeutic mood-modulating effects are largely unknown.

Author(s): 
Pascoe, Michaela C.
Bauer, Isabelle E.
Publication Title: 
Advances in Mind-Body Medicine

Like other complex, multifaceted interventions in medicine, meditation represents a mixture of specific and not-so-specific elements of therapy. However, meditation is somewhat unique in that it is difficult to standardize, quantify, and authenticate for a given sample of research subjects. Thus, it is often challenging to discern its specific effects in order to satisfy the scientific method of causal inferences that underlies evidence-based medicine. Therefore, it is important to consider the key methodological challenges that affect both the design and analysis of meditation research.

Author(s): 
Caspi, Opher
Burleson, Katharine O.
Publication Title: 
Ethnicity & Disease

Public health literature indicates that psychosocial stress is an important contributor to chronic disease development. However, there is scant research on the health effects of stress for minority groups, who suffer from a high burden of chronic disease. This paper provides a review of studies that examine the relationship between psychosocial stress and chronic disease for 4th world indigenous groups and African Americans. A total of 50 associational and 15 intervention studies fit the inclusion criteria for this review.

Author(s): 
Paradies, Yin
Publication Title: 
WMJ: official publication of the State Medical Society of Wisconsin

The majority of studies on Tai Chi conducted between 1996 and 2004 had focused on health and well being of Tai Chi exercise for senior adults. The results show that Tai Chi may lead to improved balance, reduced fear of falling, increased strength, increased functional mobility, greater flexibility, and increased psychological well-being, sleep enhancement for sleep disturbed elderly individuals, and increased cardio functioning.

Author(s): 
Kuramoto, Alice M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of obstetric, gynecologic, and neonatal nursing: JOGNN

OBJECTIVE: To examine published evidence on the effectiveness of mind-body interventions during pregnancy on perceived stress, mood, and perinatal outcomes. DATA SOURCES: Computerized searches of PubMed, Cinahl, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library. STUDY SELECTION: Twelve out of 64 published intervention studies between 1980 and February 2007 of healthy, adult pregnant women met criteria for review. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Studies were categorized by type of mind-body modality used. Progressive muscle relaxation was the most common intervention.

Author(s): 
Beddoe, Amy E.
Lee, Kathryn A.
Publication Title: 
Current Hypertension Reports

Substantial evidence indicates that psychosocial stress contributes to hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous meta-analyses of stress reduction and high blood pressure (BP) were outdated and/or methodologically limited. Therefore, we conducted an updated systematic review of the published literature and identified 107 studies on stress reduction and BP. Seventeen trials with 23 treatment comparisons and 960 participants with elevated BP met criteria for well-designed randomized controlled trials and were replicated within intervention categories.

Author(s): 
Rainforth, Maxwell V.
Schneider, Robert H.
Nidich, Sanford I.
Gaylord-King, Carolyn
Salerno, John W.
Anderson, James W.
Publication Title: 
Advances in Mind-Body Medicine

Like other complex, multifaceted interventions in medicine, meditation represents a mixture of specific and not-so-specific elements of therapy. However, meditation is somewhat unique in that it is difficult to standardize, quantify, and authenticate for a given sample of research subjects. Thus, it is often challenging to discern its specific effects in order to satisfy the scientific method of causal inferences that underlies evidence-based medicine. Therefore, it is important to consider the key methodological challenges that affect both the design and analysis of meditation research.

Author(s): 
Caspi, Opher
Burleson, Katharine O.
Publication Title: 
Ethnicity & Disease

Public health literature indicates that psychosocial stress is an important contributor to chronic disease development. However, there is scant research on the health effects of stress for minority groups, who suffer from a high burden of chronic disease. This paper provides a review of studies that examine the relationship between psychosocial stress and chronic disease for 4th world indigenous groups and African Americans. A total of 50 associational and 15 intervention studies fit the inclusion criteria for this review.

Author(s): 
Paradies, Yin

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