Symbolism

Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Biography

The iconography of the healing Buddha embraces two healing traditions, symbolized by the healing stone lapis lazuli from Central Asia and by the myrobalan fruit from the ayurvedic medicine of ancient India. The first mention of the healing Buddha is in Buddhist texts of the first century BC, and the earliest extant icons date from the fourth century AD. This suggests the cult of the healing Buddha was a relatively late development in the history of Buddhism. Worshippers sought his help in alleviating spiritual, mental and physical suffering, as well as for medical cures.

Author(s): 
Chen, Thomas S. N.
Chen, Peter S. Y.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry

Functional capacities, such as attachment and affect regulation, object relations capacity, symbolic function and language development, now documented by neuroscientific research and epigenetics, are reviewed. Results from this research, together with other factors, are posited to have contributed to effective contemporary psychoanalytic and psychotherapeutic treatments for the psychoses and schizophrenias.

Author(s): 
Gibbs, Patricia L.
Publication Title: 
Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin

From the perspective of the terror management health model (TMHM), expectancies as to whether a health behavior is likely to effectively protect one's health (i.e., response efficacy) and whether an individual is optimistic about the outcomes of his or her health risk assessment (i.e., health optimism) should have a more potent influence on health decisions when thoughts of death are conscious and the health risk domain is potentially fatal.

Author(s): 
Cooper, Douglas P.
Goldenberg, Jamie L.
Arndt, Jamie
Publication Title: 
Family Process

Wet Cocker Spaniel Therapy is a metaphor for the therapist's use of spontaneous techniques arising from the specific therapeutic situation rather than planned techniques from the therapist's training or allegiances. The paper proposes a problem-oriented, rather than technique-oriented, approach to family therapy. Most therapy can be performed in a calm, polite, rational, straightforward manner without any tricks or therapeutic razzle-dazzle. From time to time, the therapist may have to startle or jerk the family past a snag point and into change.

Author(s): 
Pittman, F. S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

Measures enabling one to assess general feelings about a relationship, social exchange behaviors, and the particularism and symbolism of resources given to and received from another were examined longitudinally in 38 dating couples. These variables were first measured shortly after a couple began to date and again approximately 4 months later. We found that in contrast to what might be expected from prevailing theories of relationship development, the later status of couples (still dating or broken up) could be predicted with a high degree of accuracy from the initial measures.

Author(s): 
Berg, J. H.
McQuinn, R. D.
Publication Title: 
Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic

Human self-awareness is not easily reducible to known principles of neurochemistry, neurophysiology, or neuropsychology. The author encourages a broader, less restrictive exploration of the nature of self-awareness as it relates to brain-injured patients. He elucidates the role of symbols in neuropsychological rehabilitation and suggests that work, love, and play are the primary symbols of normality that can reconcile brain-injured patients to their neurological condition.

Author(s): 
Prigatano, G. P.
Publication Title: 
Family Process

Received wisdom suggests that boundaries are, or should be, important in intimate relationships. In this essay, we focus primarily upon the beliefs and phenomenology relating to a variety of boundaries, and provide a discussion of some conceptual issues, in order to understand better the development, facilitation, and maintenance of, as well as restraints upon, intimacy. Although we attend mainly to dyadic relationships, we believe that our observations and suggestions have application to larger groups.

Author(s): 
Ryder, R. G.
Bartle, S.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Psycho-Analysis

Hans Christian Andersen's story 'The Little Mermaid' is read as a creation myth and a metaphor for woman's condition in patriarchy, broadly conceptualised within a Lacanian framework. In the first part, the psychoanalytic concept of castration (broadly conceptualised as containing any existential severance which forms the basis for sexual difference and subjectivity) is utilised to argue that the myth is about a construction of (mostly female) subjectivity through a series of separations or splits: (1) birth, (2) growing up, (3) desire and (4) death.

Author(s): 
TseÎlon, E.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Administration Quarterly

This manuscript offers a new view of old and timeless values: the essential ethic of love, informed by contemporary European philosophies, and caring theory, as well as ancient poetry and wisdom traditions. It integrates some of the philosophical views of Levinas and Logstrup with Watson's Transpersonal Caring Theory.

Author(s): 
Watson, Jean
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Analytical Psychology

This paper explores the fear of love and relationship which develops when a child has experienced parents who cannot tolerate emotional separation and so attempt to retain perfect contingency with their infant, long after the infant needs to begin to separate and individuate. The child is a 'self-object' for the parents, who depend on the responses of others, including their own child, to maintain a sense of their own identity.

Author(s): 
Knox, Jean

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