Tea

Publication Title: 
Phytotherapy research: PTR

The effect of a tea fortified with five herbs selected from Indian traditional medicine (Ayurveda) for their putative immunoenhancing effect (Withania somnifera, Glycyrrhzia glabra, Zingiber officinale, Ocimum sanctum and Elettaria cardamomum) on innate immunity was investigated. Ex vivo natural killer (NK) cell activity was assessed after consumption of fortified tea compared with regular tea in two independent double-blind intervention studies.

Author(s): 
Bhat, Jyoti
Damle, Aparna
Vaishnav, Pankaj P.
Albers, Ruud
Joshi, Manoj
Banerjee, Gautam
Publication Title: 
L'Encéphale

Some rituals about a regular consumption of tea, smokeless tobacco (chewing) and milk are described by one of the authors at the time of his anthropological investigation among the Tuaregs of Timbuktu's region (Mali). He carries out some ethnographical and clinical materials which highlight the dependence to these substances and the role of their psychostimulant and anorexigene effects in a society much ritualised. The subject of this article appears original in the literature which approaches more the dependence to coffee than tea, to cigarettes than to chewing tobacco.

Author(s): 
Hureiki, J.
Laqueille, X.
Publication Title: 
L'Encéphale

Some rituals about a regular consumption of tea, smokeless tobacco (chewing) and milk are described by one of the authors at the time of his anthropological investigation among the Tuaregs of Timbuktu's region (Mali). He carries out some ethnographical and clinical materials which highlight the dependence to these substances and the role of their psychostimulant and anorexigene effects in a society much ritualised. The subject of this article appears original in the literature which approaches more the dependence to coffee than tea, to cigarettes than to chewing tobacco.

Author(s): 
Hureiki, J.
Laqueille, X.
Publication Title: 
Yakushigaku Zasshi. The Journal of Japanese History of Pharmacy

Not only tea leaves, but also many kinds of plants have been used as tea, even those plants not belonging to Camellia sinensis, and they should be called "tea out of tea" in the Lucidophyllous forest zone. Generally, the tea leaf is drank after being decocted (almost boiled). The growth distribution of tea ranges in a belt-like zone of 30-40 degrees north latitude. Therefore, tea might have grown wild as "YAMACHA (mountain tea)" from ancient times in Japan as well as China.

Author(s): 
Harima, Shoichi
Yoshikawa, Masayuki
Tokuoka, Kiyoshi
Publication Title: 
Hong Kong Medical Journal = Xianggang Yi Xue Za Zhi / Hong Kong Academy of Medicine

Unorthodox (non-traditional or alternative) medicinal practices have been expanding very rapidly in western countries. Modern physicians, scientists, and non-traditional medicine practitioners now must join forces to promote evidence-based medicine to benefit patients. Green tea extracts are among the most widely used ancient medicinal agents, while androgens are probably the oldest drugs used in a purified form in traditional Chinese medicine.

Author(s): 
Liao, S.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Cancer. Journal International Du Cancer

Breast cancer is significantly less prevalent among Asian women, whose diets contain high intake of soy products and tea. The objective of our present study was to identify the combined effects of dietary soy phytochemicals and tea components on breast tumor progression in a clinically relevant in vivo model of MCF-7 androgen-dependent human breast tumor in female SCID mice.

Author(s): 
Zhou, Jin-Rong
Yu, Lunyin
Mai, Zhiming
Blackburn, George L.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Cancer Research: An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research

Alteration of actin polymerization and loss of actin filaments is a marker of cellular dedifferentiation and early malignant transformation. To study this phenomenon, an in vitro human urothelial model consisting of two cell lines, HUC-PC and MC-T11, were incorporated into the study design. These two cell lines have different malignant transformation potential. The effect of green tea extract (GTE), a potential anticancer agent, on actin remodeling was investigated.

Author(s): 
Lu, Qing-Yi
Jin, Yu-Sheng
Pantuck, Allan
Zhang, Zuo-Feng
Heber, David
Belldegrun, Arie
Brooks, Mai
Figlin, Robert
Rao, Jianyu
Publication Title: 
Medical Hypotheses

Despite recent advances in antibiotic therapy and intensive care, sepsis remains widespread problems in critically ill patients. The high mortality of sepsis is in part mediated by bacterial endotoxin, which stimulates macrophages/monocytes to sequentially release early (e.g., TNF, IL-1, and IFN-gamma) and late (e.g., HMGB1) pro-inflammatory cytokines.

Author(s): 
Chen, Xiaotian
Li, Wei
Wang, Haichao
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nutrition

Dietary flavonoids are poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. Colonic bacteria convert flavonoids into smaller phenolic acids (PA), which can be absorbed into the circulation and may contribute to the chemopreventive activity of the parent compounds. The purpose of our study was to determine whether flavonoids from green and black tea (GT, BT), citrus fruit with rutin (CF+R) and soy (S) supplements exposed to the same conditions in a dynamic in vitro model of the colon (TIM-2) will form the same phenolic acid products of microbial metabolism.

Author(s): 
Gao, Kun
Xu, Anlong
Krul, Cyrille
Venema, Koen
Liu, Yong
Niu, Yantao
Lu, Jinxiu
Bensoussan, Liath
Seeram, Navindra P.
Heber, David
Henning, Susanne M.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nutrition

Green and black tea have shown promise in the chemoprevention of prostate cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the bioavailability and bioactivity of tea polyphenols (PP) and theaflavins in human serum and human and mouse tissues. A decaffeinated black tea diet was administered to C57BL/6 mice. PPs and theaflavins were found in the small and large intestine, liver, and prostate in conjugated and free forms. The relative prostate bioavailability of theaflavin was 70% higher than that of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG).

Author(s): 
Henning, Susanne M.
Aronson, William
Niu, Yantao
Conde, Francisco
Lee, Nicolas H.
Seeram, Navindra P.
Lee, Ru-po
Lu, Jinxiu
Harris, Diane M.
Moro, Aune
Hong, Jenny
Pak-Shan, Leung
Barnard, R. James
Ziaee, Hossein G.
Csathy, George
Go, Vay L. W.
Wang, Hejing
Heber, David

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