Traditional Chinese Medicine

Publication Title: 
Manual Therapy

BACKGROUND: Neck pain (NP) is disabling and costly. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of exercise on pain, disability, function, patient satisfaction, quality of life (QoL) and global perceived effect (GPE) in adults with NP. METHODS: We searched computerised databases up to May 2014 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing exercise to a control in adults with NP with/without cervicogenic headache (CGH) or radiculopathy. Two reviewers independently conducted selection, data abstraction and assessed risk of bias.

Author(s): 
Gross, A. R.
Paquin, J. P.
Dupont, G.
Blanchette, S.
Lalonde, P.
Cristie, T.
Graham, N.
Kay, T. M.
Burnie, S. J.
Gelley, G.
Goldsmith, C. H.
Forget, M.
Santaguida, P. L.
Yee, A. J.
Radisic, G. G.
Hoving, J. L.
Bronfort, G.
Cervical Overview Group
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Pain: Official Journal of the American Pain Society

The objective of this systematic review was to assess the evidence for the effectiveness of internal qigong as a treatment option for pain conditions. Nineteen databases were searched through to February 2009. Controlled clinical trials testing internal qigong in patients with pain of any origin assessing clinical outcome measures were considered. Trials using any type of internal qigong and control intervention were included. The selection of studies, data extraction, and validation were performed independently by 2 reviewers.

Author(s): 
Lee, Myeong Soo
Pittler, Max H.
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess whether quality of life (QOL) improved in cancer survivors who had undertaken a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) intervention, compared to cancer survivors who had not. METHODS: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) was undertaken. Electronic databases including MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL, PSYCHINFO, EMBASE, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched from 1990 to 2012. Search terms incorporating the concepts of cancer survivors, QOL and various types of CAM were used.

Author(s): 
Shneerson, Catherine
Taskila, Taina
Gale, Nicola
Greenfield, Sheila
Chen, Yen-Fu
Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a structured review of eight mind-body interventions for older adults with chronic nonmalignant pain. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and evidence for pain reduction in older adults with chronic nonmalignant pain in the following mind-body therapies: biofeedback, progressive muscle relaxation, meditation, guided imagery, hypnosis, tai chi, qi gong, and yoga. METHODS: Relevant studies in the MEDLINE, PsycINFO, AMED, and CINAHL databases were located. A manual search of references from retrieved articles was also conducted.

Author(s): 
Morone, Natalia E.
Greco, Carol M.
Publication Title: 
Oncotarget

BACKGROUND: Cancer patients suffer from diverse symptoms, including depression, anxiety, pain, and fatigue and lower quality of life (QoL) during disease progression. This study aimed to evaluate the benefits of Traditional Chinese Medicine psycho-behavioral interventions (TCM PBIs) on improving QoL by meta-analysis. RESULTS: The six TCM PBIs analyzed were acupuncture, Chinese massage, Traditional Chinese Medicine five elements musical intervention (TCM FEMI), Traditional Chinese Medicine dietary supplement (TCM DS), Qigong and Tai Chi.

Author(s): 
Tao, Weiwei
Luo, Xi
Cui, Bai
Liang, Dapeng
Wang, Chunli
Duan, Yangyang
Li, Xiaofen
Zhou, Shiyu
Zhao, Mingjie
Li, Yi
He, Yumin
Wang, Shaowu
Kelley, Keith W.
Jiang, Ping
Liu, Quentin
Publication Title: 
Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Vasomotor symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats are a common concern of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women and are associated with a decreased quality of life. These symptoms can be effectively managed with hormone therapy, but safety concerns limit its use. Thus, understanding the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic therapies such as acupuncture or yoga is critical to managing these common symptoms in older women.

Author(s): 
Goldstein, Karen M.
McDuffie, Jennifer R.
Shepherd-Banigan, Megan
Befus, Deanna
Coeytaux, Remy R.
Van Noord, Megan G.
Goode, Adam P.
Masilamani, Varsha
Adam, Soheir
Nagi, Avishek
Williams, John W.
Publication Title: 
Current Rheumatology Reviews

The objective of this umbrella systematic review was to identify, evaluate, and synthesize systematic reviews of physical activity interventions for adults with fibromyalgia (FM) focussing on four outcomes: pain, multidimensional function (wellness or quality of life), physical function (self-reported physical function or measured physical fitness) and adverse effects. A further objective was to link these outcomes with details of the interventions so as to guide and shape future practice and research.

Author(s): 
Bidonde, Julia
Busch, Angela Jean
Bath, Brenna
Milosavljevic, Stephan
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

This guideline aims to provide a methodological guidance for clinical studies in TCM and integrative medicine in terms of study design, execution, and reporting. The commonly used methods including experimental and observational methods were introduced in this guideline such as randomized clinical trials, cohort study, case-control study, case series, and qualitative method which can be incorporated into above quantitative methods. The guideline can be used for the evaluation of therapeutic effect of TCM therapies or their combination with conventional therapy.

Author(s): 
Liu, Jian-Ping
Chen, Ke-ji
guideline development team
Publication Title: 
BMJ open

BACKGROUND: Clinical trials on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) should be registered in a publicly accessible international trial register and report on all outcomes. We systematically assessed and evaluated TCM trials in registries with their subsequent publications. OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of TCM trials, estimate bias risk and outcome-reporting bias in clinical trials.

Author(s): 
Liu, Jian-Ping
Han, Mei
Li, Xin-Xue
Mu, Yu-Jie
Lewith, George
Wang, Yu-Yi
Witt, Claudia M.
Yang, Guo-Yan
Manheimer, Eric
Snellingen, Torkel
Berman, Brian
Gluud, Christian
Publication Title: 
PloS One

Poor health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) is a significant public health issue while the use of meditative movement therapies has been increasing. The purpose of this investigation was to carry out a systematic review of previous meta-analyses that examined the effects of meditative movement therapies (yoga, tai chi and qigong) on HRQOL in adults. Previous meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials published up through February, 2014 were included by searching nine electronic databases and cross-referencing. Dual-selection and data abstraction occurred.

Author(s): 
Kelley, George A.
Kelley, Kristi S.

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