Traditional Chinese Medicine

Publication Title: 
PloS One

BACKGROUND: Neck pain (NP) and low back pain (LBP) are common symptoms bothering people in daily life. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used to treat various symptoms and diseases in China and has been demonstrated to be effective. The objective of the present study was to review and analyze the existing data about pain and disability in TCM treatments for NP and LBP. METHODS: Studies were identified by a comprehensive search of databases, such as MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library, up to September 1, 2013.

Author(s): 
Yuan, Qi-ling
Guo, Tuan-mao
Liu, Liang
Sun, Fu
Zhang, Yin-gang
Publication Title: 
Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

PURPOSE: This review (a) assesses the strength of evidence addressing Qigong therapy in supportive cancer care and (b) provides insights for definition of effective Qigong therapy in supportive cancer care. METHODS: This mixed-methods study includes (a) a systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) following PRISMA guidelines and (b) a constant-comparative qualitative analysis of effective intervention protocols. RESULTS: Eleven published randomized clinical trials were reviewed. A total of 831 individuals were studied.

Author(s): 
Klein, P. J.
Schneider, Roger
Rhoads, C. J.
Publication Title: 
Acta Oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)

Qigong is a mind-body integrative exercise or intervention from traditional Chinese medicine used to prevent and cure ailments, to improve health and energy levels through regular practice. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize and critically evaluate the effectiveness of qigong used as a stand-alone or additional therapy in cancer care.

Author(s): 
Lee, Myeong Soo
Chen, Kevin W.
Sancier, Kenneth M.
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Chinese Medicine

The objective of this review was to summarize and critically evaluate the clinical evidence of the effect of qigong exercise on immunity and its efficacy in the prevention or treatment of infectious diseases. Thirteen databases were searched from their respective inceptions through January 2011, and all controlled clinical trials of qigong exercise on immunity and infections were included. Quality and validity of the included studies were evaluated using standard scales.

Author(s): 
Wang, Chong-Wen
Ng, Siu-man
Ho, Rainbow T. H.
Ziea, Eric T. C.
Wong, Vivian C. W.
Chan, Cecilia L. W.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence relating to the effectiveness of qigong in the management of diabetes. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature review of qigong intervention studies published in English or Chinese since 1980, retrieved from English-language databases and Chinese journals. Qigong intervention studies conducted with adults with diabetes, which reported both preintervention and postintervention measures of fasting blood glucose and/or hemoglobin A(1c)(HbA(1c)) were included. Sample characteristics, intervention frequency/duration, and metabolic outcomes were reviewed.

Author(s): 
Xin, Liu
Miller, Yvette D.
Brown, Wendy J.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVES: To summarize and critically evaluate the evidence available from clinical trials (CTs) of qigong for patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We have searched the literature using 15 databases from their respective inceptions through March 2009 without language restrictions. Risk of bias was assessed using Cochrane criteria. RESULTS: Nine CTs, which included three randomized clinical trials (RCTs), one controlled clinical trial (CCT) and five uncontrolled observational studies (UOSs), met our inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Lee, Myeong Soo
Chen, Kevin W.
Choi, Tae-Young
Ernst, Edzard
Publication Title: 
PloS One

IMPORTANCE: Psychological and health-restorative benefits of mind-body therapies have been investigated, but their impact on the immune system remain less defined. OBJECTIVE: To conduct the first comprehensive review of available controlled trial evidence to evaluate the effects of mind-body therapies on the immune system, focusing on markers of inflammation and anti-viral related immune responses. METHODS: Data sources included MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and PsycINFO through September 1, 2013.

Author(s): 
Morgan, Nani
Irwin, Michael R.
Chung, Mei
Wang, Chenchen
Publication Title: 
Respiratory Care

BACKGROUND: Meditative movement, such as tai chi, yoga, and qi gong, may benefit people with cystic fibrosis (CF), as a form of gentle exercise incorporating meditation, breathing, and relaxation. Respiratory function is the most common issue in CF. In this systematic review we synthesized the evidence on the effect of meditative movement on respiratory function in patients with CF. METHODS: We searched Chinese and English language databases with terms relating to tai chi/yoga/qi gong, and respiratory function/cough/dyspnea. Articles were screened and selected by 2 researchers.

Author(s): 
Lorenc, Ava B.
Wang, Yuyi
Madge, Susan L.
Hu, Xiaoyang
Mian, Awais M.
Robinson, Nicola
Publication Title: 
Behavioural Neurology

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a serious condition with a major negative impact on patient's physical and mental health. Postural instability is one of the cardinal difficulties reported by patients to deal with. Neuroanatomical, animal, and clinical studies on nonparkinsonian and parkinsonian subjects suggest an important correlation between the presence of balance dysfunction and multiple mood disorders, such as anxiety, depression, and apathy.

Author(s): 
Šumec, Rastislav
Filip, Pavel
Sheardová, Kate?ina
Bareš, Martin
Publication Title: 
American journal of health promotion: AJHP

OBJECTIVE: Research examining psychological and physiological benefits of Qigong and Tai Chi is growing rapidly. The many practices described as Qigong or Tai Chi have similar theoretical roots, proposed mechanisms of action, and expected benefits. Research trials and reviews, however, treat them as separate targets of examination. This review examines the evidence for achieving outcomes from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of both.

Author(s): 
Jahnke, Roger
Larkey, Linda
Rogers, Carol
Etnier, Jennifer
Lin, Fang

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Traditional Chinese Medicine