Uganda

Publication Title: 
Family & Community Health

This article situates women's roles in community health care during violence in Uganda in the 1970s. It examines the lived reality of Catholic missionary sister nurses, midwives, and physicians on the ground where sisters administered health care to local communities. The goal is to examine how religious women worked with local individuals and families in community health during periods of violence and war. Catholic sisters claimed to be apolitical, yet their mission work widened to include political issues.

Author(s): 
Reckart, Madeline
Wall, Barbra Mann
Publication Title: 
East African Medical Journal

Few cases of erotomania, a delusional love affair, usually affecting females, have been reported from Africa. Expert opinion on the nature of this form of psychopathology is divided. In this paper, one case of erotomania from Uganda is reported after two years follow up. An account of personal experiences is provided to offer a glimpse of insight into the psychodynamics of this unusual presentation of mental illness.

Author(s): 
Ovuga, E. B.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

Social life is regulated by norms of fairness that constrain selfish behavior. While a substantial body of scholarship on prosocial behavior has provided evidence of such norms, large inter- and intra-personal variation in prosocial behavior still needs to be explained. The article identifies two social-structural dimensions along which people's generosity varies systematically: group attachment and social position. We conducted lab-in-the-field experiments involving 2,597 members of producer organizations in rural Uganda.

Author(s): 
Baldassarri, Delia
Grossman, Guy
Publication Title: 
Nursing Outlook

The primary health care model targets social, political, and economic environments as key determinants of health for populations, as well as for individuals. If nursing in Uganda is to make a difference in health care outcomes and in the health of all Ugandans, nurses must look broadly at situations and be educated to practice primary health care nursing. After 14 years of civil war, Uganda is finally experiencing a period of reconstruction and rehabilitation: the whole infrastructure is undergoing a face-lift.

Author(s): 
Andrews, C. M.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Few Positive Prevention interventions have been implemented in Africa; however, greater attention is now being paid to interventions that include messages of personal responsibility or altruism that may motivate HIV-infected individuals towards HIV prevention behaviors in Africa. We conducted 47 in-depth interviews in 2004 with HIV-infected men and women purposefully sampled to represent a range of sexual activities among clients of an AIDS support organization in Uganda. Qualitative interviews were selected from a cross-sectional survey of 1092 HIV-infected men and women.

Author(s): 
King, Rachel
Lifshay, Julie
Nakayiwa, Sylvia
Katuntu, David
Lindkvist, Pille
Bunnell, Rebecca
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

Genotyping frequently is used to distinguish recrudescent from new infections in antimalarial drug efficacy trials, but methodology and interpretation of results have not been standardized. We compared the utility of polymorphisms within 3 Plasmodium falciparum genes during a longitudinal trial in Kampala, Uganda. Merozoite surface protein-1 (msp-1) and merozoite surface protein-2 (msp-2) revealed greater diversity than glutamate-rich protein. Genotypes based on msp-1, msp-2, and all 3 genes combined were compared for 394 initial and subsequent isolates.

Author(s): 
Cattamanchi, Adithya
Kyabayinze, Daniel
Hubbard, Alan
Rosenthal, Philip J.
Dorsey, Grant
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

Measuring baseline levels of adherence and identifying risk factors for non-adherence are important steps before the introduction of new antimalarials. In Mbarara in southwestern Uganda, we assessed adherence to artemether-lumefantrine (Coartem) in its latest World Health Organization blister formulation. Patients with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria were prescribed artemether-lumefantrine and received an explanation of how to take the following five doses at home. A tablet count was made and a questionnaire was completed during a home visit.

Author(s): 
Fogg, Carole
Bajunirwe, Francis
Piola, Patrice
Biraro, Samuel
Checchi, Francesco
Kiguli, James
Namiiro, Proscovia
Musabe, Joy
Kyomugisha, Agnes
Guthmann, Jean-Paul
Publication Title: 
BMJ (Clinical research ed.)

OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and safety of rectal artemether with intravenous quinine in the treatment of cerebral malaria in children. DESIGN: Randomised, single blind, clinical trial. SETTING: Acute care unit at Mulago Hospital, Uganda's national referral and teaching hospital in Kampala. PARTICIPANTS: 103 children aged 6 months to 5 years with cerebral malaria. INTERVENTION: Patients were randomised to either intravenous quinine or rectal artemether for seven days.

Author(s): 
Aceng, Jane Ruth
Byarugaba, Justus S.
Tumwine, James K.
Publication Title: 
PLoS medicine

BACKGROUND: Drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum poses a major threat to malaria control. Combination antimalarial therapy including artemisinins has been advocated recently to improve efficacy and limit the spread of resistance, but artemisinins are expensive and relatively untested in highly endemic areas. We compared artemisinin-based and other combination therapies in four districts in Uganda with varying transmission intensity. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We enrolled 2,160 patients aged 6 mo or greater with uncomplicated falciparum malaria.

Author(s): 
Yeka, Adoke
Banek, Kristin
Bakyaita, Nathan
Staedke, Sarah G.
Kamya, Moses R.
Talisuna, Ambrose
Kironde, Fred
Nsobya, Samuel L.
Kilian, Albert
Slater, Madeline
Reingold, Arthur
Rosenthal, Philip J.
Wabwire-Mangen, Fred
Dorsey, Grant
Publication Title: 
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy

Polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum pfmdr1 gene were assayed in pretreatment samples and in samples from patients reinfected following therapy with artemether-lumefantrine. The pfmdr1 alleles 86N, 184F, and 1246D significantly increased in prevalence after treatment. All samples had a single pfmdr1 copy. Treatment with artemether-lumefantrine selects for polymorphisms that may alter antimalarial drug response.

Author(s): 
Dokomajilar, Christian
Nsobya, Samuel L.
Greenhouse, Bryan
Rosenthal, Philip J.
Dorsey, Grant

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