Urinary Bladder, Overactive

Publication Title: 
Evidence Report/Technology Assessment

OBJECTIVES: The Vanderbilt Evidence-based Practice Center systematically reviewed evidence on treatment of overactive bladder (OAB), urge urinary incontinence, and related symptoms. We focused on prevalence and incidence, treatment outcomes, comparisons of treatments, modifiers of outcomes, and costs. DATA: We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL. REVIEW METHODS: We included studies published in English from January 1966 to October 2008. We excluded studies with fewer than 50 participants, fewer than 75 percent women, or lack of relevance to OAB.

Author(s): 
Hartmann, Katherine E.
McPheeters, Melissa L.
Biller, Danie H.
Ward, Renée M.
McKoy, J. Nikki
Jerome, Rebecca N.
Micucci, Sandra R.
Meints, Laura
Fisher, Jill A.
Scott, Theresa A.
Slaughter, James C.
Blume, Jeffrey D.
Publication Title: 
Menopause International

Urinary incontinence, urgency, overactive bladder symptoms, cystitis and urinary tract infections are common conditions that collectively trouble over one-third of the female population around and beyond the time of menopause, with a detrimental effect on physical, social and mental wellbeing. Apart from pharmacological and surgical treatments, a long list of lifestyle, behavioural, physical and complementary interventions have been introduced over the years to relieve lower urinary tract symptoms.

Author(s): 
Christofi, Nicholas
Hextall, Andrew
Publication Title: 
Evidence Report/Technology Assessment

OBJECTIVES: The Vanderbilt Evidence-based Practice Center systematically reviewed evidence on treatment of overactive bladder (OAB), urge urinary incontinence, and related symptoms. We focused on prevalence and incidence, treatment outcomes, comparisons of treatments, modifiers of outcomes, and costs. DATA: We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL. REVIEW METHODS: We included studies published in English from January 1966 to October 2008. We excluded studies with fewer than 50 participants, fewer than 75 percent women, or lack of relevance to OAB.

Author(s): 
Hartmann, Katherine E.
McPheeters, Melissa L.
Biller, Danie H.
Ward, Renée M.
McKoy, J. Nikki
Jerome, Rebecca N.
Micucci, Sandra R.
Meints, Laura
Fisher, Jill A.
Scott, Theresa A.
Slaughter, James C.
Blume, Jeffrey D.
Publication Title: 
Menopause International

Urinary incontinence, urgency, overactive bladder symptoms, cystitis and urinary tract infections are common conditions that collectively trouble over one-third of the female population around and beyond the time of menopause, with a detrimental effect on physical, social and mental wellbeing. Apart from pharmacological and surgical treatments, a long list of lifestyle, behavioural, physical and complementary interventions have been introduced over the years to relieve lower urinary tract symptoms.

Author(s): 
Christofi, Nicholas
Hextall, Andrew
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy and safety of nonantimuscarinic treatments for overactive bladder. Medline, Cochrane, and other databases (inception to April 2, 2014) were used. We included any study design in which there were 2 arms and an n > 100, if at least 1 of the arms was a nonantimuscarinic therapy or any comparative trial, regardless of number, if at least 2 arms were nonantimuscarinic therapies for overactive bladder.

Author(s): 
Olivera, Cedric K.
Meriwether, Kate
El-Nashar, Sherif
Grimes, Cara L.
Chen, Chi Chiung Grace
Orejuela, Francisco
Antosh, Danielle
Gleason, Jon
Kim-Fine, Shunaha
Wheeler, Thomas
McFadden, Brook
Balk, Ethan M.
Murphy, Miles
Systematic Review Group for the Society of Gynecological Surgeons
Publication Title: 
BMJ open

INTRODUCTION: Overactive bladder (OAB) is a symptom syndrome defined by the International Continence Society (ICS) as 'the presence of urinary urgency (both daytime and nighttime), usually accompanied by increased frequency and nocturia with or without urge urinary incontinence in the absence of a urinary tract infection or other obvious pathology'. Clinical studies indicate that acupuncture could reduce micturition over 24?h, urgency episodes over 24?h, and improve quality of life among people with OAB.

Author(s): 
Mo, Qian
Wang, Yang
Ye, Yongming
Yu, Jinna
Liu, Zhishun
Publication Title: 
Menopause International

Urinary incontinence, urgency, overactive bladder symptoms, cystitis and urinary tract infections are common conditions that collectively trouble over one-third of the female population around and beyond the time of menopause, with a detrimental effect on physical, social and mental wellbeing. Apart from pharmacological and surgical treatments, a long list of lifestyle, behavioural, physical and complementary interventions have been introduced over the years to relieve lower urinary tract symptoms.

Author(s): 
Christofi, Nicholas
Hextall, Andrew
Publication Title: 
Evidence Report/Technology Assessment

OBJECTIVES: The Vanderbilt Evidence-based Practice Center systematically reviewed evidence on treatment of overactive bladder (OAB), urge urinary incontinence, and related symptoms. We focused on prevalence and incidence, treatment outcomes, comparisons of treatments, modifiers of outcomes, and costs. DATA: We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL. REVIEW METHODS: We included studies published in English from January 1966 to October 2008. We excluded studies with fewer than 50 participants, fewer than 75 percent women, or lack of relevance to OAB.

Author(s): 
Hartmann, Katherine E.
McPheeters, Melissa L.
Biller, Danie H.
Ward, Renée M.
McKoy, J. Nikki
Jerome, Rebecca N.
Micucci, Sandra R.
Meints, Laura
Fisher, Jill A.
Scott, Theresa A.
Slaughter, James C.
Blume, Jeffrey D.
Publication Title: 
Hinyokika Kiyo. Acta Urologica Japonica

Gosha-jinki-gan (GJG), a traditional Chinese medicine, is known to be potentially effective for urinary disturbance. For the clinical evaluation of Gosha-jinki-gan, we administered GJG for 6 weeks to elderly male patients with overactive bladder (OAB) and assessed its efficacy and tolerability. In this study, 30 male patients with over 6 months of OAB symptoms had received 2.5 g GJG mixture x 3/day. After 6 weeks of treatment, the efficacy, safety, and tolerability were assessed.

Author(s): 
Ogushi, Tetsuo
Takahashi, Satoru
Publication Title: 
BMC family practice

BACKGROUND: Although having a regular primary care provider is noted to be beneficial to health, doctor shopping has been documented as a common treatment seeking behavior among chronically ill patients in different countries. However, little research has been conducted into the reasons behind doctor shopping behavior among patients with overactive bladder, and even less into how this behavior relates to these patients' illness and social experiences, perceptions, and cultural practices.

Author(s): 
Siu, Judy Yuen-Man

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