Voluntary Health Agencies

Publication Title: 
World Hospitals and Health Services: The Official Journal of the International Hospital Federation

In Sub-Saharan Africa private voluntary health care providers are mostly Church-related or social not for profit organizations. They provide between 40% and 60% of health care services. In the context of Health Care Reforms, the World Bank and others have (re)discovered these non governmental providers. The World Bank document 'Better Health for Africa', promotes prominent roles for them in the execution of basic package of services and public health tasks. Unfortunately, the World Bank does not outline clearly how these roles should be achieved.

Author(s): 
Verhallen, M.
Publication Title: 
Public Health Reports (Washington, D.C.: 1974)

Community activists in Chicago believed their neighborhoods were being targeted by alcohol and tobacco outdoor advertisers, despite the Outdoor Advertising Association of America's voluntary code of principles, which claims to restrict the placement of ads for age-restricted products and prevent billboard saturation of urban neighborhoods. A research and action plan resulted from a 10-year collaborative partnership among Loyola University Chicago, the American Lung Association of Metropolitan Chicago (ALAMC), and community activists from a predominately African American church, St.

Author(s): 
Hackbarth, D. P.
Schnopp-Wyatt, D.
Katz, D.
Williams, J.
Silvestri, B.
Pfleger, M.
Publication Title: 
Planned Parenthood Review
Author(s): 
Groot, H. C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Studies on Alcohol

The history of alcoholism treatment in the early twentieth century is outlined. The methods of the Emmanuel Movement and of Richard Peabody are described, biographical details of their main practitioners are given, the populations treated are described, and the predecessors and successors of the two methods are discussed. In addition, the two methods are compared with each other and with the methods of Alcoholics Anonymous and Freudian psychoanalysis. The founder of the E. Movement was a clergyman, Dr. Elwood Worcester, whose method was designed to treat a variety of neurotic disorders.

Author(s): 
McCarthy, K.
Publication Title: 
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne

Unconventional therapies (UTs) are therapies not usually provided by Canadian physicians or other conventionally trained health care providers. Examples of common UTs available in Canada are herbal preparations, reflexology, acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine. UTs may be used along with conventional therapies (complementary) or instead of conventional therapies (alternative). Surveys have shown that many Canadians use UTs, usually as complementary therapies, for a wide range of diseases and conditions. Reliable information about UTs is often difficult to find.

Author(s): 
Kaegi, E.
Publication Title: 
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne

Unconventional therapies (UTs) are therapies not usually provided by Canadian physicians or other conventionally trained health care providers. Examples of common UTs available in Canada are herbal preparations, reflexology, acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine. UTs may be used along with conventional therapies (complementary) or instead of conventional therapies (alternative). Surveys have shown that many Canadians use UTs, usually as complementary therapies, for a wide range of diseases and conditions. Reliable information about UTs is often difficult to find.

Author(s): 
Kaegi, E.
Subscribe to RSS - Voluntary Health Agencies