Women's Health

Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To summarize and evaluate evidence for the effect of yoga on menstrual disorders. METHODS: PubMed, CINAHL/MEDLINE, Web of Science, AMED, and Scopus were searched for English-language literature relevant to the review question. All primary research studies were included. RESULTS: Fifteen studies described in 18 papers were included in the review. A range of yoga interventions were used. Some studies used a combination of Asana, Pranayama, and other yogic relaxation or meditation techniques.

Author(s): 
Oates, Jennifer
Publication Title: 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To update and expand The North American Menopause Society's evidence-based position on nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms (VMS), previously a portion of the position statement on the management of VMS. METHODS: NAMS enlisted clinical and research experts in the field and a reference librarian to identify and review available evidence. Five different electronic search engines were used to cull relevant literature. Using the literature, experts created a document for final approval by the NAMS Board of Trustees.

Publication Title: 
Journal of Holistic Nursing: Official Journal of the American Holistic Nurses' Association

INTRODUCTION: Perinatal major depressive disorder affects 20% of women, while perinatal anxiety affects 10% of women. Although pharmacological treatment has shown effectiveness, many pregnant women are concerned about potential adverse effects on the fetus, maternal-infant bonding, and child development. Approximately 38% of American adults use complementary and alternative medicine, including yoga and other mind-body strategies.

Author(s): 
Sheffield, Karen M.
Woods-Giscombé, Cheryl L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To summarize and evaluate evidence for the effect of yoga on menstrual disorders. METHODS: PubMed, CINAHL/MEDLINE, Web of Science, AMED, and Scopus were searched for English-language literature relevant to the review question. All primary research studies were included. RESULTS: Fifteen studies described in 18 papers were included in the review. A range of yoga interventions were used. Some studies used a combination of Asana, Pranayama, and other yogic relaxation or meditation techniques.

Author(s): 
Oates, Jennifer
Publication Title: 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: Hot flashes are frequent and bothersome in menopausal women and breast cancer survivors. Most pharmacological interventions or herbal therapies for hot flashes have limitations because of contraindications in breast cancer survivors, side effects, or lack of proven efficacy. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of psychoeducational interventions, including relaxation, on hot flashes in menopausal women and women previously diagnosed with breast cancer.

Author(s): 
Tremblay, Anouk
Sheeran, Lisa
Aranda, Sanchia K.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Holistic Nursing: Official Journal of the American Holistic Nurses' Association

INTRODUCTION: Perinatal major depressive disorder affects 20% of women, while perinatal anxiety affects 10% of women. Although pharmacological treatment has shown effectiveness, many pregnant women are concerned about potential adverse effects on the fetus, maternal-infant bonding, and child development. Approximately 38% of American adults use complementary and alternative medicine, including yoga and other mind-body strategies.

Author(s): 
Sheffield, Karen M.
Woods-Giscombé, Cheryl L.
Publication Title: 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To update and expand The North American Menopause Society's evidence-based position on nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms (VMS), previously a portion of the position statement on the management of VMS. METHODS: NAMS enlisted clinical and research experts in the field and a reference librarian to identify and review available evidence. Five different electronic search engines were used to cull relevant literature. Using the literature, experts created a document for final approval by the NAMS Board of Trustees.

Publication Title: 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To update and expand The North American Menopause Society's evidence-based position on nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms (VMS), previously a portion of the position statement on the management of VMS. METHODS: NAMS enlisted clinical and research experts in the field and a reference librarian to identify and review available evidence. Five different electronic search engines were used to cull relevant literature. Using the literature, experts created a document for final approval by the NAMS Board of Trustees.

Publication Title: 
Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology

Concerns about the safety of oestrogen-based hormone replacement therapy after publication of the Women's Health Initiative study and Million Women Study has led to women turning to alternative therapies, erroneously believing that they are safer and 'more natural'. Evidence from randomized trials that alternative and complementary therapies improve menopausal symptoms or have the same benefits as conventional pharmacopoeia is poor.

Author(s): 
Rees, Margaret
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care

BACKGROUND: Acupuncture as a therapy, and acupressure as self-treatment, are increasingly widely used for gynaecological conditions, and this study aims to review the scientific literature on their effectiveness. METHOD: A systematic review of controlled trials of acupuncture or acupressure for gynaecological conditions, published in a European language. SYNTHESIS: No studies in mastalgia, menorrhagia, pelvic pain, premenstrual syndrome or vulvodynia met the inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
White, A. R.

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